Emotional Energy

Emotional Energy

Two employees have been given two average evaluation for their annual performances. One of the employees walked in his bossโ€™s office with anger radiating from his eyes like glowing charcoal. He screams and says very bad words cursing his boss. The boss gets mad and starts shouting and kicks the employees out of his office. The other employee walks with the same level of anger to his bossโ€™s office (not the first one) and starts shouting. The boss eyes him, nods his head and make friendly bodily gestures. After two minutes the boss invites the employee to sit down to clear the situation. The employee walks out with a smile on his face.

Anger like any emotion is energy. Anger leads to the dissipation of this energy chaotically. Anger is a state of disorder and entropy favors it. So, the spontaneity of anger to produce chaos is favored and it takes a wise manager to hold it. The second manager has this wisdom for he absorbed the anger till the angry employees lost his energy to cool down and lesson with more understanding to the evaluation.

Cooling down from anger to a more settled state isnโ€™t a spontaneous process because it leads to more order. This is like a crystal of ice melts easier than it is to make the crystal by freezing water. Storing anger isnโ€™t wise as well because anger is energy and energy cannot beย created or destroyed, but it can be transferred/ transformed into one form from another. This transformation of energy isnโ€™t without cost as some energy is lost. This is the law of entropy as, and the energy is usually lost in the form of heat. Considering emotions as energy moving in waves means that emotions maybe transferred from one form to another with some energy lost, normally as heat. Studies have shown that all negative emotions have higher energy than positive emotions. Hence, the spontaneity of emotions flow is from the high-energy negative emotions to the low-energy positive emotions.

Negative emotions such as anger are like a bonfire that once starts burning continues its burning process spontaneously. The burning of bonfire produces more disorderly gases and loses heat and so the burning continues till we are burn out of its fire. This doesnโ€™t mean we donโ€™t need negative emotions because they are linked to our basic needs- that is survival.

ย Because of their spontaneity we might overlook the importance of transforming the negative emotions to positive ones.ย 
Ali Anani

This is like going uphill and requires work, but this is necessary for our well-being. Studies have shown that for everyone negative emotion you have at least three positive ones. But beware, too much of even the best thing can be simply dangerous. Experiencing positivity at above 8:1 can have counterproductive effects.

Our negativity bias prompts us to research more the negative emotions and pay much less attention to the positive emotions.
Ali Anani

It is amazing that despite the importance of emotions in steering our lives we are still unable to define them. The awakening to the understanding of the thermodynamics of emotions is a very promising field to improving our understanding of them.


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Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#44
Thank you Joannie Fischer for your generous appreciation

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#42
Lack of communication skills is problematic indeed. Worse it is if coupled with lack of emotional intelligence. Thank you Preston \ud83d\udc1d Vander Ven for highlighting communication as a root cause of anger.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#40
Thank you Paul Walters. I hope you are enjoying your life in Bali.

Paul Walters

Paul Walters

2 years ago #35

Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee Well said as always

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#38
I am not less blessed than you are dear Tausif Mundrawala to be connected with you. Thank you for your genuine friendship

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#36
I like your description dear Tausif Mundrawala "Anger is like the storming tide which could never be tamed if not controlled properly and if we did than we can master the art of controlling our emotions.". If we can do that and control anger that will be fine. Maybe finer if we tame the anger and keep it within its motivating energy band. You counted many causes of anger that are built on injustice. Eventually, people reach their tipping point and erupt like a volcano as we witnessed in the Arab Spring.

Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

2 years ago #32

#32
Harvey, I think we are seeing the multiplicity of human behavior played out, as usual, through the filters each of us carry around in our minds. There are some wonderful studies done of observations of behavior viewed by people of different cultures. What we sense is often 20 or 30 percent actual and 70 or 80 percent imagined. AS well as we may be trained we can sometimes miss the obvious by building a false observation around it. that being said, I like your idea that success may be attributed to perseverance instigated by anger.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#32
I agree with your statement "I just believe at some point anger must give way to another motivation". I add also the time factor because anger if prolonged may cause damaging effect.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#29
Preston \ud83d\udc1d Vander Ven- I agree and your comment is in accordance with my previous comment. However; I wonder if the spontaneity of reacting to anger wouldn't generate distracting new problems. maybe moderation in anger will help transforming anger to positive energy, Maybe the hard consequences of anger may complicate issues and this happens when the intensity of anger goes beyond its "sweet zone".

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #29

#26
Don't disagree, I enjoy our discussions and challenges. I think we all can find mentors and detractors within our background. Anger seems to be the initial response to character challenges. I just believe at some point anger must give way to another motivation. My suggestion would be that many that ride the anger fail, those that morph the intial thought into a more constructive energy tend to succeed. If we ask any person of success I would imagine they would state percerverence in lieu of anger as their basis of success. Maybe we are splitting some hairs here. I have recognized many who did hang on to the anger and many who grew other characteristics from the same.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#29
I agree, but again I wonder if the spontaneity

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#24
#25 There are positive sides in anger. If anger is channeled it could be useful. Here is a reference . It reads: "It's Okay To Be Angry Psychologists examining the expression of anger are finding that it can help resolve disputes when combined with a proactive approach. When two people use anger to work towards a solution, rather than to vent about how theyโ€™ve been wronged, anger is actually a positive emotion". https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/yourmentalhealth/2013/08/the-benefits-of-being-angry If anger is turned into enthusiasm and deep willingness to do something positive it becomes helpful. But I find from my experience that the instantaneous response to anger may create problems that sour relations. It is a big challenge.

Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

2 years ago #26

#27
And so it goes...

Pascal Derrien

Pascal Derrien

2 years ago #25

#26
I was one of them (not that I am successful or well known that is) was told by a math teacher that I would not go very far in life providing my lack of grasp of mathematics.... I am the first to recognize I am not great as I am more at ease with words but.....

Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

2 years ago #24

#24
Harvey, Sorry buddy, I have toargue with you on this one. I have interviewed too many people that have spoken of having risen to prominence and/or excellence from where they were due to being told by teachers, coaches and family members, "You will never be able to..." or You're not cut out to be... The focused anger and the following work ethic developed drove them to success.

John Rylance

John Rylance

2 years ago #23

#22
I wonder if focussed anger is that which is channeled into aggression, or is it misplaced aggression which becomes chaotic anger. Certainly in many sports over aggressiveness can be anger or lead to anger on those at the receiving end. Whichever/Whatever there can be a thin line between controlled and chaotic anger/aggression. The important thing is to be able to manage either or both.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #22

#22
You highlight some unique individuals within our history. I would have to say though, it wasnt anger that propelled these folks but rather the dream or vision was greater than the negative feed back. Our visions of future success do not fare well if anger is what propels us, but the vision would need to be a strong belief that works outside of the feedback loop itself. I believe change management understanding applies here. Anger is not change management. A strong vision of future success with appropriate present motivation can greatly enhance the change management process. Feedback typically comes from folks that see change as failure. With this understanding we need not be angry. Rather we need to practice strong change management skills in attracting folks who are willing to take this risk with our vision. Your historical figures new they were going against the status quo, competition and other variables. They saw these as part of the vision. Anger is the first step with negative feedback, but it must give way to change management styled techniques at some point. Proving someone wrong is not a vision but a suicide route.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Dear Jerry Fletcher- thank you for differing with me because differences can be the bridge for more understanding, or for distancing people. Like sweet stress there is also sweet anger. I am talking about the latter and you are referring to the sweet anger. I don't differ with you on this.

Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

2 years ago #20

Dr. Ali, I must disagree with the proposition that "Anger is a chaotic stream..." Anger, focused, can be a powerful force that leads to incredible feats of physical and mental power. Think of the athletes like Michael Jordan cut from his high school basketball team who became one of the greats. Or Tom Brady, the New England Patriot's quarterback told he would always be a back-up who now continues to play when most his age have retired. Consider the fact that Thomas Edison, one of the greatest inventors of all time, was told as a young man that he was a failure. When someone says, "you can't" to some individuals the anger results in focus that lasts and effort that surpasses all others. And so it goes.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#20
Dear Vishwas Asolkar- I enjoyed reading your comment immensely. I love in particular your writing "n energy of creativity to achieve more of a force due to passion to bring out good ...". I experienced this myself that whenever I had a creative idea I was in the state your described elegantly and truthfully. As for anger killing intelligence and reasoning I again agree fully with you. Anger is like a stream of water if goes in many directions it doesn't generate power. Anger is a chaotic stream of scattered water.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#17
Thank you dear Debasish Majumder for commenting and sharing the buzz.

Debasish Majumder

Debasish Majumder

2 years ago #17

prefix 'D' before anger always yield an adverse consequence. on contrary anger sometimes make positive impact for the working force to accelerate for a boss with a restrictive quotient. however, lovely buzz sir Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee! enjoyed read and shared. thank you fro the buzz sir.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#15
Great thoughts and I am thankfully going to read now the document which you dent for me. I shall then respond to your great thoughts here and solid reasoning. Thank you dear Harvey

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #15

#14
Jung submitted that our make up consisted of a shadow-ego-persona. My review of this has lead me to ponder that most ego level paradigms are built to change the persona for personal benefit, success or wisdom at some level. I place EI at this level of concept. Whatever ego, persona executable training we may get it will always suffer from a cognitive dissonance within our shadow. I do for success that which i don't believe. Once we engage our shadow along the lines of self awareness a new paradigm begins to emerge for the ego to manage naturally. If we use your two bosses we can see that boss 2 saw the employee from a different perspective. Boss 1 saw the employee as a person who did not recognize their place in the hierarchy and felt obliged to place them back into their rank. If we stretch a bit. Boss 1 needed the hierarchy to exist as part of their paradigm/shadow. Boss 2 did not need this hierarchy in their shadow. Relieving Boss 2 from a ego level social construct and applying their own deep belief system. If we were to ask each boss to describe what they saw in the employee they met, two very divergent stories would appear. Boss 1 felt threatened, boss 2 saw an opportunity to help someone who was near chaos. EI emerged from boss 2 naturally because of shadow axioms. His ego new exactly what to do. Boss 1 shadow stated he was in trouble and needed to defend. Could boss 1 read a book go to a seminar or other self help in EI and truly execute the skill, with his shadow screaming he is threatened? The EI training may be first steps to change, but at the end of the day the shadow will need to be sorted. It is a formidable driver of our ego.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Harvey Lloyd- I am just pondering on our exchange of thoughts here and in our exchange of messages. One blurred idea that came to my mind is relating EI to Carl-Jung. I am still clarifying the idea in my mind. I am sure your thoughts will enrich my mind the the minds of your readers.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#11
You captured the essence of the buzz by explaining why I offered the two scenarios to start with. The second boss knew how to bring order from the chaotic anger because he "2nd boss had undergone self awareness to the point he was able to see the edge of chaos and order the employee was describing." What you are saying there are ways to bring order from chaos if we manage to move out of the "skin" of normal axioms. That is consistent with my own thinking.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#9
You are aware that emotional intelligence is a complex topic because it is based on complex emotions. No wonder that it is still not well-understood in spite of so many efforts to grasp this concept. You asked a great question Harvey Lloyd and that is " Is emotional intelligence really intelligence or more of behavioral modification"? You then ably answered it, or helped to answer it by your second question "Is emotional intelligence really intelligence or more of behavioral modification"? I agree with you and you are to say that "EI proposes that we can insert a skill between the emotion and the behavior. This really does not modify behavior but rather institutes a control mechanism". How then best to connect behavior with EI? Again, you offer an answer "EI emerges naturally when we have dealt with the axiomatic roots of our auto-responses". It is the intelligence of moving out of our established routines and habits. SO much to ponder on.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #11

In your post you demonstrated two very different scenarios of outcome. Setting myself outside the issue, like watching a movie i can state that the boss showed EI in the second scenario and not in the first. But i rely on a very socialized construct to say this. He displayed EI in the 2nd because he did not give the natural, socially acceptable standard response, as he did in the first. Also we measure each outcome and we see the second as the best outcome. What was the motivation of second boss? Given the 1st scenario, would the EI training really have the impact to make scenario 2 happen? My very personal interpretation of the scenarios is that two bosses existed. 1st boss was axiomatically in auto response mode. 2nd boss had undergone self awareness to the point he was able to see the edge of chaos and order the employee was describing. Not to say 2nd boss didn't hear the anger, but it did not have control of the higher thinking of the employees position at the boarder of personal chaos. This brings to mind the lifeguards are trained to expect the drowning swimmer will drown them in order to save their life. Giving thought that we all act in ways at the edge of chaos that are sometimes self destructive. Leaders know this.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#8
Your WOW!!! is so sweet my friend Bill Stankiewicz, \ud83d\udc1d Brand Ambassador

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #9

#4
Emotional intelligence appears to signal a wisdom journey. I struggle with the concept as i witness various "skills" within the paradigm and measure the effectiveness in outcomes. Is emotional intelligence really intelligence or more of behavioral modification. So i stand a little confused in this area. I believe that EI is a way of establishing root cause and effect within an emergent paradigm. But the concept does require us to review the deeper roots of behavior cause and effect. Behavior is the extrinsic witness of our emotions at any given moment. EI proposes that we can insert a skill between the emotion and the behavior. This really does not modify behavior but rather institutes a control mechanism. I also think that EI when delivered with perfection can be seen as manipulation at worst, fake at the least. EI emerges naturally when we have dealt with the axiomatic roots of our auto-responses. Where did they come from, what do they rest upon and do they currently benefit the goals i have established. This is a very nebulous journey as we start thinking from within the fishbowl these axioms were built. It typically requires new "personal physics" for us to leverage in thought to help us get above our own fishbowl. I can witness someones EI but from a personal perspective EI is really in the eyes of the beholder.

Bill Stankiewicz, ๐Ÿ Brand Ambassador

Wow ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Thank you dear Harvey Lloyd for sharing the buzz in the Leadership Hive. Greatly appreciated

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#3
This is a mirror of what I meant in my previous comment to your great approach to self-awareness.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#2
If I spend the next week Googling to explore your thoughts it shall not be enough. I am amazed and need really quality time to dig deeper in this comment as well Harvey Lloyd. In particular to "From a self awareness perspective, it is incumbent, within our growth to wisdom scenarios, to actually test our auto responses". You recall that I published recently a buzz on Self-Awareness and that is a remote dream. https://www.bebee.com/producer/@ali-anani/is-self-awareness-a-remote-dream You introduce a new approach to understanding self-awareness and it is a treasure kind of thought

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#1
What a deep and thought-provoking comment my dear Harvey Lloyd. There are so many challenging thoughts in your first comment (I haven't yet read the second one). I choose two point. First- your writing "Emotions emerge when we face the edge of chaos and order". This is a great thought because rarely we mention the emotional tipping point and the interactions of simple emotions that take us to the edge of chaos, after which we either self-organize, or go into destructive actions such as wars. The complexity science needs to cater for the complexity of emotions. Because they are complex they exhibit emergent complex pattern of their own. I am surely going to explore this issue in a greater detail. Second- Your writing "If we can ignore our own emergent emotions we can lead others to different levels of wisdom within their own emergent emotions". You introduce a new view of approaching emotional intelligence. I wonder if this thought has been discussed before. It is worthy of researching. I am puzzled and emotionally stirred by the high quality of your comment.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #3

In the calm of our living room and the clouds of yesterday seem far away. Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee offers a calm review of how our leadership involves emergent emotions and their impact. Looking from both the Boss and the Employee angle how has the emergent emotions of all three people displayed themselves? Understanding the various outcomes and views is a great step forward of becoming self aware. Understanding this also offers a greater influence in changing outcomes.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #2

Emotions are habitual. They reside in our minds as automatic responses that have protected us in the past. Most of these get set within our first few years of life. Growth would dictate that we review these auto responses to see if they still apply later in life within different environments. This review process is one of the biggest challenges for leaders as they face emergent emotions from great team members that are auto responses from their earlier years. From a self awareness perspective, it is incumbent, within our growth to wisdom scenarios, to actaully test our auto responses. Are my emergent emotions in my family/professional life benefiting in the way i wish to travel? This is an evaluative question. It is not a question of right or wrong. Let's reverse the view as displayed in your post. The boss that experiences an employee who has undergone various personal reviews of their emergent emotions (has on a consistent basis sought to restrain or change their extrinsic leverage on their behavior) would be received differently. The boss no longer has to worry about his/her emergent emotions as they are not triggered within the review process. True dialogue can happen on both sides about future improvement. Both the boss and the employee leave believing in a shared future of wisdom.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #1

Emotions are a strange thing as we look at the ebb and flow of the various one's we encounter through out our day. To the point we have labeled them, designed positive and negative dialogue about each one. From the utility to the destructive nature of emotions, scientists, philosophers and religious organizations have all weighed in on various pragmatic approaches of emotional control for humanity. Wars are literally started based on emotional responses to situations where leaders feel out of control. Not that i have some gifted insight to the issues and utility of emotions but i do sense that we always look at emotions from the outside in. A view of emotions and their impact within a given environment. Me writing about the topic i am thinking about the positive and negative effects emotions have inside solutions of success. Again an extrinsic view. A better look at emotions would describe them as emergent. Emotions emerge when we feel threatened in some way. This could be physical, professional or axiomatic. Emotions emerge when we face the edge of chaos and order. We are feeling drawn into chaos and emotions are our way of applying the brakes within a given environment. Your post rightly identifies within leadership we must see emotions as an individuals way of avoiding chaos. Although appearing personal on the surface it is really just a person reaching for a personal life ring. If we can ignore our own emergent emotions we can lead others to different levels of wisdom within their own emergent emotions.

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