Homogenization of Opinions

Homogenization of Opinions

A glorious comment by CityVP Manjit on my previous buzz titled “Divorcing a wife who isn’t” suggested McLuhan meant that the world is homogenizing and losing its diversity, that as we fly from city to city, the world is becoming just one extended global village”. Homogenization of societies and the homogenization of milk was my first reaction idea to Manjit’s comment.

Then my mind stretched to other possibilities such as the homogenization of opinions and its possible evil effects. My mind even questioned the validity of using the word homogenization later on for reasons I am going to disclose later.

Some opinions are like milk and water as they don’t mix together. To homogenize water and milk requires the turning of milk into a state consisting of extremely small particles distributed uniformly throughout water. Homogenization results in making the big particles small and the small particles even smaller. The main benefit from that is less sedimentation and separation, more consistent product and longer shelve lives. There is an issue here that contradicts the use of homogenization of the global village. I pause here to give the reader sometime to think about it.

In analogy, homogenization means making the big nations smaller and the small ones even smaller. But this isn’t what is happening in our world. The big nations get bigger and the small one smaller. This results in a long-tail distribution of nations with few big nations and a long tail of many small nations.

On the surface we may see very colorful image. We know that small particles (small nations) scatter light differently from big particles (big nations). This colorful image can be a decorative sweet cover of the underlying ugly image below. What seems to be a homogenization is in reality a heterogenization. Big cultures, big languages, big nations and big dreams end up in eating up the small ones. We are removing the small cultures, languages, nations and dreams and along with them the beautiful scattering of light they produce.

This isn’t a false claim. The homogenization of plants from a foreign (exotic) land to a domestic one has resulted in big problems. One example is the California Invasive Plant Council inventory showed about 37% of invasive plants were accidentally introduced as contaminants in seed, clothing, equipment or packing materials. Aren’t we also contaminating domestic cultures with the seeds of imported foreign cultures? These seeds might be insignificant to pay attention to, but their cost over time could be hugely high.

There are other big issues with homogenization that isn’t. When we homogenize milk particles by exposing them to high treatment the molecules of fats and proteins rearrange to and this means their metabolism in the human body may change course and outcome. The blending of different cultures, languages, opinions and whatever doesn’t only result in mixing them, but also in the breakdown, rearrangement of some or all of these components and some new behaviors may emerge. Like homogeneous milk that could lead to weight gain, poor nutrition and hardening of arteries so, are is the global human body may result in all of these ill-effects. Homogenization of cultures isn’t immune to these effects.

The formation of big cities has deprived villages from growth opportunities and led to disastrous effects. I predict that the globalization of cultures, opinions and languages may lead to the same. Tasting as sweet as globalization and homogenization maybe, their ill-effects should be monitored carefully.


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Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#47
Hi Deas, I thoroughly enjoyed your comment, especially the part on moving even one person as this will be worth the effort of writing a buzz. Thank you. Have a wonderful and joyful day.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#45
I just ask you one question Deas Plant. Why I chose to comment on your buzz among hundreds? Because it moved me. How many great innovators had no official degrees? This includes Bill Gates. We know as long as we think we know.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#43
Hi Deas Plant because he is a technician and yet his profound insights amaze me. Now, you repeat the story by saying you are a bulldozer operator. So what my friend? Your comments and buzzes say a lot about your qualities.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#41
I am terribly sorry dear Tausif Mundrawala for I have just accidentally noticed your comment because my name in your comment isn't highlighted. I enjoyed so much your brilliant comment- so much that it is worthy of a dedicated buzz. I paused on your line "... the narrower the space between homes the wider the differences". You remind me of two electrons if they get two close they repel each other. Making cultures almost the same could face the same by repelling each other.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#39
Thank you for your thoughtful and focused comment Jennifer Leach-Trask. True, small nations if have the agility then they are less exposed to abrupt changes. They are less bureaucratic and the rigidity of big nations may harm them. I believe we need a balance between the big and small and that making the big bigger can harm us all. Like flavors that we add to food, we add them in small amounts, but they also extend delicacy to the food.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#36
Thank you Roberto De la Cruz Utria and for your great reflection by giving a very relevant example. You remind me of water added to sulfuric acid. AT the beginning this exothermic solution is dangerous and spays randomly due to the generated heat. After a while, things cool down. So is the case of the USA experience as conflicts resulted initially, but over the years things settled down. Your comment is self-explanatory and I am just trying to explain it with the water-acid metaphor.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#33
Thanks for your appreciation

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#31
I wish you the best my friend . You are amazing as you care to read and share buzzes even though you aren't in the mood to comment. There must be a good reason behind it being yourself a mature lady. I hope things will turn out to your best.

🐝 Fatima G. Williams

🐝 Fatima G. Williams

2 years ago #27

#21
Thank you dear dr Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee Wishing you and your family a blessed and Happy season of Ramadan. My self determination is under self scrutiny but I will come around. I am always here reading all the beautiful comments and wisdom each one fo you offer every day😇 Looking forward to engaging in your discussions soon.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#29
The funny part my friend is that they call it homogenization, which isn't. Homogenization makes the small small and the bigger smaller that that we may get homogenization. What is happening is that the big gets bigger and this is a far call off homogenization.

David Navarro López

David Navarro López

2 years ago #25

Homogenization, under my point of view, is one of the most filthy and rude ways of domination. And one of the oldest. It limits and mentally castrates our natural singularity. Actual education had its roots on the Austrian Empire on the 18th century, on which all children were obliged to go to school, with the same books. Initially was a good thing. But soon it became a way to "produce" tailor-made citizens, to classify them with standards which obeyed to rules accordingly to the wishes of the power. It was demanded good workers and soldiers. Therefore, discipline took over creativity. Natural talents were put aside if they were not a communal necessity. Originality, singularity was squashed under the boot of power, and it has been like this until now, in a growing trend. Because free, self-thinking people are dangerous for the ones in power. Everyone was belonging to humankind until racism disconnected us, religion put us apart, politics divided us and money classified us. Humans, crazy we are.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

My friend David Navarro L\u00f3pez- I am certain you have great ideas to enrich the discussions here.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#26
DEar Lisa Vanderburg. He lost his daughter and wrote a book "The 90- seconds mind manager" describing how he coped with his great loss. I know the familiar is to dedicate my own writing, but this time I do dedicate your comment to Ed. It is also he who helped you dear Lisa to write such a deep and moving comment. Ed shall be pleased to read this from your comment "Evil and loss, sadness and all the ulgier sides of us would still be there, but they should become the last response". Dear Lisa- You rose like a rose to magnanimity

Lisa Vanderburg L

Lisa Vanderburg

2 years ago #22

Another wonderful water-hole I have missed! But you are right - we should be treading very carefully now, lest one step becomes the downfall of a million others Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee. Funny, I've been discussing this on Researchgate in response to EC4 Project : https://www.researchgate.net/project/EC4-Project-Make-the-planet-great-again-really-no-bla-bla '..... we need to heal ourselves first. By that I mean of all the baggage we have and still carry; so much of it not necessarily of our making. Think (for example), divorce. Excluding the obvious reasons couples seperate or the rational for that, our kids carry that undeserved 'guilt' that becomes ingrained. The death of a parent/sibling/loved-one we experience as children - that too, we carry along inappropriately, unless someone teaches us what a correct response should be. If we could be unreservedly human, where compassion, love, joy, curiousity and kindness was our primary response; where we could rise to magnanimity as a first impulse....then we can build on that. Teach our kids a new 'default'. Evil and loss, sadness and all the ulgier sides of us would still be there, but they should become the last response. The adults our children and grandchildren become, face enormous challenges. The saner, more grounded they are, the better chance of a worth-while survival we have for us and the planet.' I have yet to work out if this is helping or not.....le tired!

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#24
"You may find that you and Thomas Jefferson are kindred spirits of a deep genealogy.". What an honor you bestow on me. I will say that I am confident that the same applies to you. Reading your comment shows the complexity of the issues we are discussing. I shall add add a buzz on what I like to coin as "Social Micelles ". This is analogous to the agglomeration of water molecules around fat. These micelles are subject to vary in shape depending on many variables. SO, are social micelles. They adapt to the changing environment and conditions. This is a buzz on its own and now I have so much to sort out. I shall explain soon. What a motivation your comment is!.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #20

#23
You may find that you and Thomas Jefferson are kindred spirits of a deep genealogy. The minds of the era drilled on the very question you seek to answer. To the point of fisticuffs and arguments that would make reality TV. Highly inflammatory topic when we begin to discuss a humans obligations to other humans. We tend to get a little testy when self determination is sacrificed for the good of society. Needed, but never liked in its birthing. The arguments of "fair play" emanate from this single axiom. If i am to relieve myself of certain self preservation positions then it must be unilateral across all. Sounds reasonable until we examine execution. Special conditions exist within each culture whereby absolutes dont work. How you sort these determines future consequences. Such as we are experiencing here in the US. Self determination is under scrutiny from all angles. We need to take back some we gave away, or we need to give more. Depends on your political bent. Our founders new the founding documents had a life expectancy to the point when folks realized that they could vote favor for themselves. (I am reminded of your post on Greed:))

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#22
Any suggestion from you is taken seriously my friend. My self-imposed challenge is fulled by your suggestions. Amazing your sour suggestion is because I am thinking of what to include in my next buzz and I decided to include individual versus social identity. Your comment is therefore timely and very sensible. I may need more than a buzz to cover the whole issues. Will sure will tackle all your suggestions in them.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #18

#20
In considering your self imposed challenge i would direct you to some of the more basic tenants that would be required within a homogenous mountain. Some core axioms that would need to be included: 1. Self preservation by the individual; 2. Self determination by the individual; 3. The individual can not be sacrificed for the group. Just three areas as you write the future constitution of the new humanity. From these three a world of definitions get created within the emergent properties of these core axioms. Consider both the inclusion and the exclusion of any of them and see what it wipes from the definitions. Second and still in the primary fundamentals would be the enforcement of these fundamental axioms. Third and most important the enforcement within a blind judgement with compassionate discipline. Somehow i sense you may come to the same conclusions as the US Constitution and Bill of Rights. Yes i freely admit my confirmation bias. Please accept this humble admission.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Dear - Thank you for sharing the buzz. I must admit that I greatly miss your comments and buzzes. Why are you "fasting" on writing?

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#19
And you initiated the challenge. I nicknamed you before Harvey Lloyd as my mind-agitator

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #15

#18
A challenging task you have assigned yourself, Godspeed.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#17
I confess that the comments here trickled my mind and I am now seriously considering writing a followup on this buzz. I want to refer to separation thinking being this or this and not this and that. I want to explain the natural tendency of molecules (humans are made up of a vast number of molecules) to group together and agglomerate and the dynamics of this agglomeration, its survival and dispersion. I want to link to the agglomeration of data and its uses. I want then to extend to culture. I find your last line so challenging to the mind, "Bringing the human onto a single mountain will be the millennial challenge". The momentum of societies and its dynamics deserve greater attention from us. Can we meet the challenge of "Homogenizing the fundamentals of existence within a social construct, we can all surround, will be the ultimate goal"? I shall dare to give my own thoughts in the forthcoming buzz my soulmate Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #13

#7
Reading over the replies here it appears to be a subject of great interest and wisdom seeking. The comments are interesting and thought provoking. Taking a look at Maslow's Hierarchy, as simple as it is, we get a sense that when ones economic well being gets threatened culture has more meaning. When economics within the group offer opportunity then we are generally more accepting of differences. It is when, either physical or psychologically, our food clothing and shelter becomes threatened, we tend to homogenize into our cultural groups. We band together to meet the threats real or perceived. I think history proves this threat out with study of the momentum of societies just prior to major wars. This is the cycle that history has attempted to deal with and one we must confront as humans. Homogenizing the fundamentals of existence within a social construct, we can all surround, will be the ultimate goal. The US Constitution attempts to strike this balance with the understanding that erosion of implementation over time is part of the issue. Depending on what mountain of intellect you choose to stand the point of view changes. Bringing the human onto a single mountain will be the millennial challenge.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#13
Your experience and reflections are great dear Chris \ud83d\udc1d Guest. In Qatar and the Gulf countries in general we see harmony even though so mant different nationalities are very close together. I believe that because of the wealth people find it easier to cope with this situation. But again you may find pockets of minorities who support a conflict with their home countries. I want to say that aggregation of the homogenized culture is possible under favorable conditions. I add my voice to welcome the comment of our friend Clau Valerio

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#11
You bring a key point in your comment dear @Clau Valerio and that is the sense of belonging. People are closer to their land, tradition, language, culture and groups than they are to their counter global ones. This is very important point and people shall not dispose ff what they belong to easily. We tend to see the surface value of the iceberg of globalization. Below the surface we see a different story. Even in less complex we notice the iceberg of homogenization. As stated in the buzz, the iceberg of milk homogenization. On the surface it looks idealistic; below the surface it is a different story. We see that the change of the size of milk particles and the rearrangement of the protein and fat molecules behave differently in the human body and can lead to some unhealthy consequences. WE nee to see the iceberg and not its surface only.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#10
This is what I find from my own experience dear Franci\ud83d\udc1dEugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador. I share your opinion.

Franci 🐝Eugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador

There may be sameness in globalization but, there is difference, as well. IMO, homogenizing tendencies will always have conflicts with cultural diversity. Even though, there may be globalization of cultures, languages, and opinions, differences will still exist. The wind will always change direction.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Clau Valerio- my friend I know your background shall add great value to the discussions here.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#4
My friend @Edward Lewellen- I don't disagree with you even some caution must be exercised. In Amman (the capital of Jordan) there are people who come from more than eighty different cultures. It is like fish living in a fish pond rather than an ocean (USA). people are living in peace together. Moslems celebrate Xmas and Christians congratulate Moslems on their feasts. However; this is done with respect to the other cultural values. Even the eating habits vary from one region in Jordan than the other. It is a delicate balance. I have worked a Jordanian who was married from an American citizen. Her parents migrated to the USA from Italy. Her parents visited her and I met them in a dinner party. The surprise was that even their daughter had PhD in linguistics, the parents could hardly speak one word of English. The respect for "pockets of culture" allowed them to live their lives at their will. You remind me of one of my most recognized researches. People tried for long times to mix old tires with asphalt. This process failed because asphalt and tires being organic mixed will. However; the inorganic filler/aggregate tend to strip out. What I did is using a molecule with one organic end and the other with an inorganic one. This molecule acted as a bridging agent between the heterogeneous asphalt components with great results. I want to conclude that the process we encourage self-homogenization is crucial for the success of the homogenization efforts. It is a tricky issue.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#3
Homogenization varies between material and another. The conditions by which we homogenize one culture with another may not be suitable for another culture. I agree with your valid point Harvey Lloyd that mixing axioms is challenging. One example is tissue homogenization. There are homogenization guides. As good as these guides maybe, they ignore the post-homogenization problems such as heart-transplantation . Even homogenized milk started to raise issues because of the change in molecules sizes and arrangements that make them function differently from the original milk molecules. SO are cultures as they may cause the emergence of new issues that were not anticipated. The collision of cultures may lead to similar harmful social arrangements.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#2
Cyndi wilkins on LinkedIn. The Vega car failed in French and Spanish speaking countries because its name means the car that doesn't go. Here we have a good example of local culture/language and its dominance. Like you highlighted, homogenization may cause rearrangement/ folding and therefore in different sizes that can't pass through the walls of human cells. The global body is the same and that homogenization may lead to unforeseen harmful consequences.

Cyndi wilkins

Cyndi wilkins

2 years ago #4

#4
Ha! Soooo true Edward Lewellen...I dare not wear my Patriots shirt anywhere other than New England;-) Just about got driven off the pool deck in Miami recently....and they beat the Pats in a crazy wild finish this year...But didn't make the playoffs;-( Hey, beating the BEST team in football is a winning season in and of itself Dolphins fans! Did I just throw myself under the team bus here?!?! Lol

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #3

This is a very sensitive and well deserved conversation. Globalization in economics has brought with it the attempt to globalize cultures. Each culture found truth in their upbringing and assembled societal axioms. We may be able to work in commerce together but culturally it is difficult to merge the axioms. Axioms are a part of our cultural heritage. I do not declare one is better or worse, rather merely state that the finance of ones food clothing and shelter sets atop the axioms of the culture. It is a package deal. Commerce has brought many great things within globalization. That was the easy part. With our cultures beginning to gain mass in different countries we each bring our cultures. The host culture stresses the newcomers while the newcomers stress the host. This would seem a natural cause and effect. The question is how do you merge these through discourse? Establishing shared areas first, would seem to be the first step. Politics through media and some branding efforts seem to stress the derogatory differences. This seems counterproductive. If we wish for economics to merge then we must find common ground culturally to merge also. Great discussion.

Cyndi wilkins

Cyndi wilkins

2 years ago #2

If we really take a step back to observe the 'big picture' here...we will see how billions of species on this planet have already been destroyed in the wake of human civilizations...(and I use the term civilized loosely) as our historically linear, self-serving thinking has brought us to the fringes extinction ourselves. A very distinct point for all of us to consider Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee... "The blending of different cultures, languages, opinions and whatever doesn’t only result in mixing them, but also in the breakdown, rearrangement of some or all of these components and some new behaviors may emerge." Case in point...Behaviors need to change...mostly by those living in great prosperity...Those of us in the 'cheap seats' are trying desperately to get through to an out of control population of massive carbon footprint offenders...lest the big fish realize that they too will eventually die, most likely prematurely, in their own polluted pond.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

CityVP \ud83d\udc1d Manjit- you are quoted in this buzz.

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