Reputation Survival

Reputation Survival

The idea of this buzz was triggered by a comment made on my last buzz by Sara Jacobovici. In my response to Sara's comment I found myself introducing the term "Reputation Survival". This is a topic that interests me. We talk about life survival and strategies plants, animals and humans employ to survive. I felt the issue of reputation survival merits more focus on.

The increased use of social media has broadened our exposure to the world and created many unthought-of opportunities. Opportunities come with risks and one risk is the possible harm to our reputation capital. For how long can we survive if our reputation is at risk? More are the unexpected sources of risk that may initiate from a comment on social media that could send a business or individual on a downward spiral.

There are cookies recording our activities on social media. We thrive hard to make our history recordings of good reputation. However; a simple tweet might spread like fire and "burn" our reputation. Small acts have their butterfly effect our reputations either in fostering this reputation or damaging it. The damage shall not bet localized as it can spread globally. In fact our strengths could be also our weaknesses. A global company like McDonald's with more than 33000 branches worldwide has the strength of the Multiplier Effect. If business goes down in one area it may boost in another one. This is true except that when it comes to reputation this force turns into a great weakness. Reputation has a rippling effect. If in one location McDonald's is accused of treating chicken brutally or that the company uses animal oil in vegetarian food the whole worldwide branches then the whole company suffers. These events happened repeatedly and the question is what strategies do we have to ensure the survival of reputation?

Many companies made the mistake of defending or arguing with claims and by denying them. They lost the battle and their reputation vanished. Instead of courageously admitting their mistake they wanted to prove the claims were false. This only agitated the complainers who managed to pool resources to prove their claim.

If you are leading a company and a claim is made that would jeopardize the survival of the reputation of your company what would you do? Equally important is what not to do? I am trying here to pool as many ideas as possible so that we may learn together


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Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Rescuing reputation is a topic that is worthy of compiling and learning on how to go about it

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#45
I agree with you and your perspective is correct and eye-opener

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#44
I have seen many products fade out because of bad luck. I recall the NOVA car as an example. This car was a good one. However translating it is name to no va pas -meaning the car that doesn't go- killed it. Reputation is difficult to restore, but there are few examples of successful efforts. So, I agree with you in that reputation costs are beyond control.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#41
Rich experiences may result from poor relationships. Or better, "Life can teach us tough lessons but it also gives us the opportunity to grow without regrets". You now how to move hearts and minds Lisa \ud83d\udc1d Gallagher

Lisa Gallagher

Lisa Gallagher

4 years ago #35

Sorry for typos below, my phone keyboard and i dont get along

Lisa Gallagher

Lisa Gallagher

4 years ago #34

#40
I think we gain inner strenght when we learn that no matter how good our intentions may be and/or some people are just not reasonable, well we can either allow them to kerp hurting us or stand on principle even if it mesns cutting ties. Life can teach us tough lessons but it also gives us the opportunity to grow without regrets. I have many flaws, I can only hope they keep me grounded, loving and never bitter or revengeful. โ˜บโ˜บ

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#39
Nobody can be daring as you are Lisa \ud83d\udc1d Gallagher in sharing her personal stories and sharing her real experiences. My friend Lisa this is a paradox: our expected friends turn out the least supportive people. Sad to read your story, but equally sure of your inner strength.

Lisa Gallagher

Lisa Gallagher

4 years ago #32

#34
I have to share Ali Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee that my sister in law and brother in law were horrible to me in the months that followed the passing of my mom. They go to Church every Sunday, preach it on Facebook but they don't walk the talk! My sister in law became passive aggressive with me and my brother in law wrote me less than a year after mom passed, "I know it hurts but it's been YEARS since your mom passed and it's time to move on." This was AFTER I deleted both of them from my facebook friends list. They came to my mom's memorial but I never heard one word from them after the fact. I gave them 6 months in my mind (because my sister in law wrote me a nasty letter) about missing their wedding anniversary party 4 months after mom passed. I actually wrote her first to let her know we missed them, explained why we couldn't be there... it was 3 weeks before my daughter's due date and my daughter developed a few medical problems. My sister in law knew this and shrugged it off (she doesn't have grandchildren yet) and they live 3 hours from me. Needless to say, I didn't want to be out of town while my daughter was ill and so close to delivery. As it was, she delivered 2 weeks early People can be cruel, even those we 'call family.' They eventually apologized but not for their actions per se. I forgave but I can tell you this, I will never forget. My husband on the other hand, wont have anything to do with them anymore. It's sad, they even make it clear that their church family comes first. I can sleep at night!

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#36
My dear Tausif Mundrawala- I can copy and paste your comment and exchange our names and your comment shall still be valid. You are a wonderful learned and humble human. I may suggest for you to read my buzz of today so that you may know what I think of people of your high caliber.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#33
Again I agree with you Lisa \ud83d\udc1d Gallagher. You wrote "There are rare cases where I won't do that if I know I wasn't wrong". I would say that it is wrong to apologize for a mistake that isn't. Wrong doings may make things worse. It is the responsibility of the wrong person to say I am wrong. Agai, we need the correct actions always.

Lisa Gallagher

Lisa Gallagher

4 years ago #29

#31
I like that saying, "We don't have erasers to clear mistakes other than this one." Couldn't agree more. I would rather admit fault that be so stubborn that I turn others away. I find it fairly easy to say, "I was wrong, please forgive me." There are rare cases where I won't do that if I know I wasn't wrong and the other person will continue negative behavior just because I thought it would help to say, sorry first. Life is short, I don't want regrets.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#24
-Great and please tag me to your forthcoming buzz CityVP \ud83d\udc1d Manjit

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#30
Thank you Lisa \ud83d\udc1d Gallagher. I appreciate greatly your sincerity in giving personal examples to communicate your ideas. This makes your comments highly credible. I am on the same boat. Nothing shall change a mistake except admitting it. We need to be able to be responsible for our mistakes and have the courage to correct for them. We don't have erasers to clear mistakes other than this one.

Lisa Gallagher

Lisa Gallagher

4 years ago #26

Great points Ali Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee . We all make errors in judgment from time to time, that's called being human. To admit our faults is an attribute. People are much more forgiving if a person or company is able to rectify a wrong. I can't tell you how many times I had to go into one of my children's rooms after a disagreement. I will happily admit I jumped the gun or over-reacted more than once. But, I would go into a quiet place and think about the incident that just took place and if I knew I was wrong, I'd go in and apologize along with talking about the incident. My mother did the same and I believe that taught us an invaluable lesson. Same can be said about Social Media.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#22
Ned McDonnell- thank you Ned for making an important comment. Yes, I agree with your comment " is that digital reputations are usually easier to repair because digital anything does not have the sticking power of more traditional media (particularly print and word-of-mouth)". However; not always the digital media may couple with traditional media. I have witnessed news over an issue on the internet being carried to me through the word-of-mouth. It is when the two media combine that the effect is multiplied. I agree with you 100% on "...Swiss corporate giant had the integrity to admit the mistake and make amends for it". Yes, this is the correct way. People admire courage and making mistakes and will tend more to tolerate them this way. WE can't correct a mistake by another mistake.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#25
siraj shaik- please don't "deprive" us of your comments and we need voice. "sharing voices through various ways became a methodology of approach". Very true and very-well said.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#24
reat and please tag me to your forthcoming buzz CityVP \ud83d\udc1d Manjit

CityVP Manjit

CityVP Manjit

4 years ago #22

#23
This will be incorporated in a buzz I still have not written which will be called "Image and Being".

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#22
Thank you Mr. Jerry Fletcher would be interested in revealing his standing on this issue.

Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

4 years ago #20

Mr. Anani, you do know how to spark a discussion. Whether it is Personal or Product what is being discussed here is brand in my opinion. There are cases that demonstrate the good and bad of how to handle it. A few years ago poison was discovered in an over the counter headache cure in the USA called Tylenol. The company recalled all product currently in distribution, reworked the packaging to prevent pilfering, paid all expenses for those injured and ws tranaparent through all the actions they took. The product was reintroduced and is today, a major brand in the category. On the other side of the equation, we have the recent illustration of how not to operate at the edges of the company--United Airlines removal of a paying passenger from an overbooked flight to generate space for a deadheading crew. This one reeks of bad behavior. First, overbooking. Most airlines do it. They claim it is because statistically they know a certain percentage of passengers won't show. That is true a very high percentage of the time but when it doesn't happen, some passengers are usually willing to delay their trip for an appropriate incentive. (One friend who flies internationally tells me he always plans an extra day on both ends of a trip, "just in case" to get the incentive and or enjoy a day in a transfer city at airline expense). In this case, no incentives were offered. The staff at the airport may have been trying to get the flight out on time or just never learned that United is supposed to be the "Friendly Skies." Videos on social media went viral. Headquarters defended the staff instead of publicly disciplining them. if the core has no values how can the edge? Social media in this case provided the power for a wronged individual to have his "day in court." Two cases. One brand trusted now more than before. One brand in disrepair due to a lack of trust.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#20
I think part of the problem is reporting without evidence, or reporting using false info. Politicians have been doing both as well and the result is loss of trust and reputation. For example, a tweet with a photo and/or images can be more by far effective than "naked" tweets. I share your point Deb\ud83d\udc1d Lange, Brand Ambassador @beBee that employees who care to work for a company with good reputation have responsibilities. Sometimes employees are oppressed from voicing out their concerns. They live in duality of conflict: to please their conscious or to stay for they need the salary. I believe leadership is also responsible for delivering what they claim or promise.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#18
- Very true

Devesh ๐Ÿ Bhatt

Devesh ๐Ÿ Bhatt

4 years ago #17

#17
in line with your comment....which types of business get hurt more and do the small ones always have more to lose? We cannot eat cake everyday, on special occassions we wont compromise on quality. But a daily eatery or a quick pick may be forgiven more easily although it damages us more.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#14
I can't say you are wrong Devesh \ud83d\udc1d Bhatt. A famous cake house was red stamped for low of quality. It was closed for few days. After re-opening it experienced sluggish demand, but then the business improved. However; not to the same level it experienced before. I asked few of my friends if they still buy from the same cake house. The answer was mostly "sometimes" because the cake house shall not dare to do it again. This is the paradox: play devil so that you can't be a devil again!!!

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#13
Sara Jacobovici- whenever you comment or I read one of your buzzes I can be almost sure that a new idea will pop up. Your questions raise an important issue "how prepared should we be to the possibility of risking or having our reputation risked by others? Do we need a preventive strategy? Maintenance strategy can be costly and ineffective. If preventive strategy is a choice then what actions we need to take in advance? I agree with Harvey Lloyd that having core values is one effective way of reputation. It is not cosmetics beautifying the facade, more it is in the heart of all employees. Your question "Can there be Reputation Survival without the responsibility involved in being consciously aware of what and how we communicate and how we respond to any negative events"? opens the door for meaningful discussions.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#9
Brilliant comment again my friend Harvey Lloyd. Your writing is wonderful "Lesson? Realize that time is a part of the equation as we look at those who bark against our reputation. To answer a bark in some cases legitimizes the false argument". An Arab poet said centuries ago the if we would throw stones at each barking dog then stone would be more precious than gold. This is a hugely important issue. When to respond and how? SOmetime passive actions are needed and sometimes they don't. There was a British brand of cigarettes that used to sell like hot cake in Jordan in the seventies. A competitor spread a rumor that those cigarettes will make men infertile. Soon afterwards, nobody was buying this brand.

Devesh ๐Ÿ Bhatt

Devesh ๐Ÿ Bhatt

4 years ago #13

#10
true. But events that shake us are plenty today. KFC had worms in its burger. Mcd had a grasshopper Maggi had cancerous substances and Hyatt had a lizard in its bread. A majority were shaken but fewer remember. There was a show on Discovery called Lonely Planet. His advice to travelers, eat in local Indian eateries with open kitchens where everything is made in front of you. Dont have the water and salads. Good advice is forgotten. Western tourists still flock to KFC following gps and food sites, this isnt the West. Mass producers are the biggest defaulters of quality whether Indian or MNC, but they build a reputation and earn from it. Even the lonely planet guide got revised. Next time you visit India, do tell, i would share the list of clean, good food outlets. But getting back to point, it will be an interesting study to see the retention of people in general regarding certain brands. Which ones are forgiven more easily than others.

Sara Jacobovici

Sara Jacobovici

4 years ago #12

Thank you for the mention in your buzz Ali Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee. I think that the term you coined, "Reputation Survival", is so timely and I can see it as being the other side of the coin of branding. We take great pains to come up with the perfect branding, yet, can it stand up to the consistency of how we present our personal or corporate brand on the various streams of social media? Then there is the aspect of responsibility. As you say, "These events happened repeatedly and the question is what strategies do we have to ensure the survival of reputation?" Shouldn't the one strategy be taking responsibility? Can there be Reputation Survival without the responsibility involved in being consciously aware of what and how we communicate and how we respond to any negative events? Your buzz, as always, Dr. Ali, inspires more questions.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#8
I don't have to go far and say your reputation as the scientific poet of beBee is gaining publicity dear debasish majumder. Goodness no, but if somebody makes a claim that you stole one of his poems how would you react? I believe the reputation issue transcends borders wit its huge impact.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#5
You have a personal experience worthy of discussion. I do hope I read comments on your comment.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#4
Devesh \ud83d\udc1d Bhatt- in reference to your writing "People have short memories and there is too much information . Big brands have the money and resources to cover things up and regain ground" I may say the following. Studies have shown that people remember the last thinh that happened to them and the most intense one. The rest they forget fast. So, if you see a photo of a juice with an insect inside it you shall refrain from drinking this juice depending on the degree of disgust you felt. The same thing applies to info n my own experience. I plan to write many buzzes, but the ones that I write mostly is influenced by my last buzz and the buzz that stirred my mind intensively. I wrote this buzz because of a comment on my last buzz. We forget a lot, but much less so the events that shake us.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

4 years ago #8

#6
We have a choice in business, maintain a core value set within our employees/organization or build a facade and maintain it. In the beginning the facade is easy to build and we get quick results. This is how we can get drunk with success. Facades don't weather very well, and over time become maintenance headaches. Within a facade we have to carefully choreograph everyone's moves, words and presentations. However the quick success has established an unruly group of folks who cant be choreographed. All facades wind up being leveled, regardless of money. The larger question is can your business survive until they get leveled. I would submit the hard work required to establish your core values and instill them within your organization is the only path to survive. A dog cant bark forever. A barking dog sometimes instills a sense of immediacy of action on our part. Successful businesses i have engaged with realize the barking dog will either quiet, get put down or otherwise be silenced. The barking dog is his own worst enemy. In the beginning character is automatically given to the bark. But over time the dog will show its teeth and the listeners of yesterday will see what was behind the facade. Lesson? Realize that time is a part of the equation as we look at those who bark against our reputation. To answer a bark in some cases legitimizes the false argument. Speak carefully, if at all, to the barking dog.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#3
yes, I agree Harvey Lloyd. It is easy to make claim, but who shall defend them if proven wrong. I believe you highlight a core point in your comment. Employees who work for a company and feel disengaged may be due to the missing gluing core values or worse abusing them. Disengagement from core values shall lead to ruining the reputation of a company.

Devesh ๐Ÿ Bhatt

Devesh ๐Ÿ Bhatt

4 years ago #6

http://m.timesofindia.com/city/kolkata/Haldiram-owner-4-others-get-life-imprisonment-in-murder-case/articleshow/5513634.cms Technically speaking, the traditional seller was actually a tea stall owner also selling sweets .it is Kolkata, i had gone to a friends marriage about 2 months after this sentence. debasish majumder may also be aware.

Devesh ๐Ÿ Bhatt

Devesh ๐Ÿ Bhatt

4 years ago #5

Contd My exbosses have covered the social.media space well, they could not afford print media.. but they continue to function and the work isnt so big for Pearson to shell out more budget. As far as i am concerned. My reputation is still down, i became an enterpre eur by compulsion as no one would give me a job.i dont even have any red in my cv, just no exit letters.But people doubt it. At the end of the day realised that companies are into unethical and illegal practices and they tjink i can figure it out so the reputation part is just an excuse. The very same people hire me as a consultant. Personally, i prefer a job because the negotiation part is painful. But hey, reputation becomes a convenient way to ignore that.

Devesh ๐Ÿ Bhatt

Devesh ๐Ÿ Bhatt

4 years ago #4

Nestle/ Maggi lost a few days of business due to genuine health hazards and bad practices discovered in their products. They recalled everything, reintroduced themselves with premium products and higher pricing and yet got back as the market leader. People have short memories and there is too much information . Big brands have the money and resources to cover things up and regain ground. Now lets take an individual case or a small firm .Reputation once destroyed, they do not have the money to cover things up. A case of a local sweet seller. There were strong allegations of poor quality because a Branded sweet seller had just opended a retail unit opposite this traditionally famous shop. 6 year long litigation and he proved he was being framed. Came back with a certificate of quality, but the noise on the internet continues across media even today. The branded sweet seller, Haldiram, has its owner in jail on charges of attempted murder of the traditional sweet seller. Haldiram is such a big brand and a market leader in India that it had once offered to purchase Manchester United People still go to Haldiram but this traditional sweet sellers business has really taken a bad hit. He says no one is spending money to defame him now but he cant afford to clean the internet of thw bad news. Reputation can be easily managed by those with money. It is a big market out there. It only gets soiled if someone bigger spends some money to promote your misfortune. Even a one time spend can hurt a lifetime. Now look at me. I had a bad reputation for 3 years until my ex bosses got caught doing the wrong things which i had warned them about in writing. The authorities refused to hear me out. When pearson came along, they presented the same evidence and the authorities listen.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

4 years ago #3

#2
I spent considerable time in my early life reading and studying negotiating. The one thing i learned, we don't give our brain enough credit. Specifically as it applies here, to reputation. Our senses tell us when "what" someone is saying "is a little fishy". Even when we hear the espousing of core values we know this is merely a defensive strategy not something that is ingrained in the company. Simon Senek had a great video when he discussed core values at the edge of a company. Certainly the reputation and core values may be front and center at HQ, but do they exist at the fringes of the company. Your comments of exposure coming from disenfranchised employees speak to this edge where core values don't penetrate the whole of the organization. If your brand espouses your core values through out the organization then when the anomaly shows up your own people will defend you.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#1
Harvey Lloyd- truly simple is powerful. The simplicity of your comment is filled with wisdom. Your writing "Reputation is what you do when no one is looking". I am just thinking of companies who makes claims that are untrue because nobody is watching then the companies aren't watching the risks for their reputation. How many times an ex-employee ruined the reputation of their previous companies with documentary videos. These companies forget that there must be somebody watching them discretely. A competitor, an angry employee or cheated customers. This is a foundation for a strategy of doing things as if everybody is watching. This is an idea to entertain. You set the stage for discussion with your brilliant comment Harvey.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

4 years ago #1

Reputation emanates from our core value set. I believe what folks see in a negative event is the core value aspect of our companies. The act itself may be negative but as humans we compare the event to our own value set. Reputation is what you do when no one is looking. Then when they do look they find core values that allow for mistakes and challenges. Corporate core values are not a shield during bad times but rather a brand that your constituents and customers need to see in every act. The core values trotted out only at problem junctions are seen as a paper tiger, easily destroyed in the media. This post is an extension of the great discussion it was born from. Our strengths must bare the burden of our core values or they do become weaknesses during the storms.

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