Why Increasing Organizational Capacity Is Vital?

Why Increasing Organizational Capacity Is Vital?

The idea of populating ideas in my mind caused me to write this buzz. We tend to populate ideas in our minds. But for how long can we populate more ideas in our minds? And at what rate? In our times it is the fastest that wins and not the fittest. So, we need to populate ideas fast. But at some point, chaos may result and we may suffer from loss of direction and not knowing where to go. I envisage the population of ideas follows the logistic map equation. It’s called the logistic map because it maps the population value at any time step to its value at the next time step:

                                                                                  Xt+1 = rXt(1 - Xt)

This equation defines the rules, or dynamics, of our system: x represents the population of ideas at any given time t, and r represents the growth rate. It is interesting that the equation shows an emerging behavior. If we increase the growth rate we get first a linear growth of ideas, till a point where bifurcation of ideas occurs. As we increase the population of minds while keeping our initial brain storage capacity the same soon we get close to the 100% capacity of our brains. This leads to the strange behavior of the population of ideas bifurcating between two values then four and so on till our brains reach a chaotic state.

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We need to increase our mind’s capacity to be able to fill them faster so that we may not run into the zone of chaos. In contrast, I believe many organizations have lost some of their capacities because they neglect feeding it with an increasing rate of new ideas.

There are different kinds of organizational capacities such as creativity capacity, planning capacity, change adaptation capacity and ideas retrieval capacity. There is a need to increase the capacity of each capacity. For example, increasing the capacity of an organization to innovate is possible by using a six-pronged approach as Kippy Joseph suggest in her post titled “Six Factors that Boost an Organization’s Capacity to Innovate”. The author charts out the six factors employed in enhancing a firm’s capacity to innovate. These are:

1. Having leaders who are dedicated to innovation

2. Diverse staff who are committed to innovation and are able to make decisions

3. A clear vision of why the staff do what they do

4. Clear assignment of tasks. I find here that self-organizing teams are best in allocating tasks among them and that allowing the emergence of self-organizing teams id utmost importance.

5. Active feedback on all levels among the staff, and with what is happening outside the firm.

6. Learning and allowing for failures. I agree entirely as successes emerges from failure.

Increasing the capacities of organizations happens when people are self-motivated and engaged because they do what they do because that is what interests them to achieve a vision shared by all the staff. May be more is owning the vision. When people are self-engaged and motivated and work to achieve an organizational vision, they become fully immersed. These staff don’t need command and control; more they connect and collaborate without unnecessary interference of others.

Controlling and commanding staff will only reduce the capacity of an organization to innovate. There is tendency for some businesses to tighten the rope by applying more of the command and control approach. This is a recipe for failure. The more staff members connect and collaborate, the more likely they shall produce more innovative ideas and the more they need to expand on their capacity to populate those ideas in their minds. Command and control will only shrink their capacities at a time when they need most to expand on them.


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Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#18
Your comments are like fuel that keep my soul aspiring to write more dear . I do appreciate your comments and I thrive on them.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#15
Instead of increasing organizational capacity some managers work on reducing it. Killing creativity, repelling talents, applying command and control and other measures with uimmeasurable harmful effects is truly a problem. Thanknyou Franci\ud83d\udc1dEugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador for highlighting the darkness of poor managers. The paradox is that they highlight darkness

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Thank you Peter Stefanov for sharing the buzz.

Franci 🐝Eugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador

Controlling and commanding staff can result in loss of creativity. The six factors by Kippy Johnson are spot on IMO. During my career, my team and I experienced such rigid guidelines and parameters relating to a project that we felt like puppets. Our capacity was definitely reduced as well as our creativity. Excellent buzz, and brings back memories of questions during interviews. The purpose of the questions was to seek employees that are innovative and can make worthy decisions. So, IMHO the organization needs the right person for management, as well. Stifling creativity can lower morale and cause employees to seek employment elsewhere.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#13
There are different types of capacities and mind capacity is one of them. We may need our mind capacity vertically and vertically. That is increasing our thinking skills (left mind) and our imagination skills (left mind). The left mind is the thinking part, which we may enhance its capacity by connecting with others, sharpen its analysis thinking (such as asking the 5-whys). AS Einstein referred frequently to the role of imagination the right mind may expand on its capacity by going to nature and being more creative. The total capacity of both the two minds will increase greatly this way because the two mind feedback to each other. Thank you for commenting and sharing the buzz. You may also think of fear as a mind-capacity reducer and hence I find your buzzes on fear interesting.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#11
Jerry- Chaotic systems are what they are - chaotic and are unpredictable. Complex systems are somewhat predictable as we know roughly where they would end up.

Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

3 years ago #9

Ali, I apologize for not pursuing the mathematics with rigor opting instead to see the soap bubble at the right of your graphic representation. Surfaces meeting like those in soap bubbles look chaotic but behave in very predictable ways. Is it possible that a similar phenomena lurks here?

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#9
9 Thank you for your great comment. AS I mentioned in my previous response ideas that are worthy contribute 20% of all ideas. May be then the focus should be on selecting ideas from the 20% ideas that are important. But, the law of large numbers says it is better to have large number of ideas so that the best 20% ideas may emerge. We need first to diverge and then to converge.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#5
Thank you so much CityVP \ud83d\udc1d Manjit for taking the time to enrich the discussions. I also thank you for the linked article, which I find amazing. In this article I read "Why is this a problem? Because organizations expend so much of their energy in the conceptualizing and testing phases that execution—financing, manufacturing, scaling up, marketing, and managing—gets less attention. As a result, a high percentage of initiatives do not progress beyond the pilot stage". Do we consume ideas similarly and end up in that 20% of the ideas charging 89% of our energies? If so, they follow a power law meaning that they may produce a chaotic strange attractor. I have to pause and think.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#4
The story you present dear Debasish Majumder is quite interesting. Building capacity on lies is a false one. That is why leaders must first gain the trust of followers before they may learn from him. If we don't trust somebody they shall not trust his knowledge as well and even if knowledge is useful people shall not trust it and eve try to refute it. Capacity-building need a trustful source.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#3
You too sent my mind buzzing and I felt it pressurized to think of the great analogy you presented Bill King. Interestingly, I find how the kettle whistles interesting enough to consider writing a buzz when I collect my "pressurized" thoughts. I just need first to find more about the the kettle whistles. You know trapping air in a test tube by slipping a cork in the test tube will make the air whistle. Whistling minds is a great idea to consider carefully.

CityVP Manjit

CityVP Manjit

3 years ago #4

You are presenting a world that you know that I and also people like Milos Djukic enjoy, so this buzz for either of us is a delight ! Thanks for introducing in the thoughts of Kippy Joseph. https://www.rockefellerfoundation.org/blog/six-factors-that-boost-an-organizations-capacity-to-innovate/ The vast majority of organization do not get past point 1, never mind being then capable of considering the other 5 points. There is another article by Kippy that I found which is far more resonant with what you are presenting here, and in that one she and her co-author present three paradoxes. https://ssir.org/articles/entry/embracing_the_paradoxes_of_innovation 1. The Paradox of Cultification 2. The Paradox of Collaborative Compromise 3. The Paradox of Invention Within Convention These paradoxes come into play as the cycle of ideas in organization approach that moment of chaos at the fourth cycle. For those who are not clear about these four cycles they should watch this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPdlzfRdfxs and then they will see that you relate them as values. The original article by Geoff Boeing simply speaks about the level of complexity we are addressing here http://www.mdpi.com/2079-8954/4/4/37 but the irony of course is that as complexity scientists study these bifurcations that is what gets one to the "butterfly" or Lorenz Curve (Strange Attractors) The whole premise is based on initial conditions which in this case are brilliant leaders. This is why the paradoxes are important when we get beyond this.

Debasish Majumder

Debasish Majumder

3 years ago #3

Sir Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee, i wonder whether do we possess at all any capacity to enhance our capacity? i once came across a story where a boy who rears animal used to amuse by screaming 'Tiger, Tiger', just to draw attention of the people in and around him, craving to rescue him, and felt elated by deceiving innocent people. but one day when he was fallen into the prey of an original tiger, none responded and helped him, thinking he might be devising to deceive them. equally, when the true change emerge, demanding for an overhauling of the available situation, hardly majority may respond and virtually it may pave the way for its extinction. it is the external condition which plays the major role for ushering the requisite change and failing to respond will inevitably beckon utter jeopardy. however, great insight sir! enjoyed read and shared. thank you for the share.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#1
I agree

Pascal Derrien

Pascal Derrien

3 years ago #1

Reading your various approaches on capacity the word velocity imposed itself surely that could create capacity :-)

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