Why Not Move in a Straight Line?

Why Not Move in a Straight Line?

Moving in a straight line may be the shortest path, but not necessarily the fastest and most-rewarding path. We tend to draw opposites on straight lines and not in an arc form, to give one example. This idea crystallized in my mind upon reading the comment of CityVPΒ Manjit on my previous buzz in which he wrote β€œYou have explained this very well as an arc of development, maturation, loss and renewal”. His use of the words β€œarc of development” was the seed for writing this buzz.

We notice the arc of development of stories. Great stories don’t move in a straight line; they move in arcs, so they may have the capturing conflict that keeps the story alive. As the story develops the environment changes and the hero must adapt to these changes. These changes in the environment aren’t necessarily linear and therefore the story moves in an arc.

The β€œarc of healing” is another example. Dr Heidi Skye, DC wrote a very interesting article about this topic. She wrote β€œOne thing I teach all my patients is that symptoms follow an arc. Like every process, there is a cycle to healing: a beginning, middle, and an end”. Again, it is the story of healing.

Birds don’t flock in straight lines. They follow a sharp v-shaped arc. Not only this as their wings have a curved shape like an upside-down spoon. This way the bird may build thrust or glide in the air and gain push -forward movement. If the wings were straight they wouldn’t help the birds flow in the air. To keep in the flow the birds know how to adapt to their surrounding environment to serve them rather than impede their movement.

Not only this. Many birds like falcons don’t approach their prey on land or in water in a straight line. They follow an arced path. Because of the location of the falcons’ eye they must follow in an arced path to keep sight on their preys while on flight. They follow a flight pattern that is shown in the image below.

63db2e0e.jpg

Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  The birds’ part of the image was uploaded byΒ Paolo Salaris

Moving from point A to point B follows a curved path and not a straight path. The arc is a Fibonacci-based one. It is amazing how much we can learn from birds.

The idea of following an arced path was highlighted by Daryl Conner. In an article titled β€œFINDING THE BALANCE BETWEEN LOGIC AND CREATIVITY” he presents the image below:Β Β 

db73f39d.jpg

Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β Source: http://www.connerpartners.com/practicing-our-craft/finding-the-balance-between-logic-and-creativity


In moving between opposites, we don’t necessarily follow a linear path; more likely and profitably a curved path. It is interesting to note that the dotted green curve looks like the falcon’ curve while flying.

The complexity of our world makes the arc movement the most profitable one. Do you agree?





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Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#60
I dare say that you shall dear Proma. You shall surprise yourself. I say it with confidence.

Proma 🐝 Nautiyal

Proma 🐝 Nautiyal

2 years ago #53

#59
Thank you, sir. I am not sure if I'll be able to put my thoughts I to words as succinctly and clearly as you do but I can definitely give it a shot. Need to do some self introspection first and find out how the mind arc actually works.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#57
Great comment my dear Proma \ud83d\udc1d Nautiyal. You asked a question and answered it beautifully too. You bring an interesting point that the best way to move between the left brain and right brain is following an arc. This is a leading thought and is worthy of your further elaboration. You may consider writing a buzz about it.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#56
Great reminder and addition to the discussions.

Proma 🐝 Nautiyal

Proma 🐝 Nautiyal

2 years ago #50

I loved this buzz, sir. So many things make so much sense now. One of them being my love for logic in everything even though I am a passionate creative person, by profession. Although for me, the presence of the two is a normal occurrence, but I always thought about the left brained vs. right brained logic. The arc explains it well. Guess that explains why the rainbow is an arc too. Doesn't it?

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#54
I must confess that I missed your thoughts and great comments lately Harvey Lloyd. It is so great to read your comments again. I love the idea that the straight line helps as a reference. This is a balancing thought and I find it very relevant. Your justification is so rich that I don't need to add to it. Yes, in reality we don't move in straight lines in our complex environment. However; using the straight line as a reference to gauge our progress is a noble idea.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

2 years ago #48

#49
#48 Physical properties within math can certainly attain a straight line. I would guess that with infinite energy anything can be made straight. For humans though straight lines are elusive. With each human added to the group the possibility of a straight line happening diminishes. This is not because of more people but because of needed diversity in success. We can never start a new project with full knowledge of path and outcome. The diversity of others pulls us from the perceived straight line onto the curved shapes Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee expresses here. I wanted to add to the discussion that the straight line is needed though. The perceived line between A/B is the reference line. You can change it but it only makes you aware that you are doing so. WIthout the A/B line we can't anchor our thoughts to anything and realize we have changed or more importantly, with new information know we have too. Its a bit to far when we consider it failure that we didn't stay on the straight line. The straight line could represent the vision, goal or outcome desired. Even include the time element of the beginning and end. The line serves to give us something to compare to as we go through the "S" curves. Great discussion, as always.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#52
Your idea dear Lada about storytelling is worthy of exploration. Meanwhile, I am digesting the rest of your comment. It is worthy.

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

2 years ago #46

#49
Yes, dear Ali, a straight line is not just the shortest but the fastest path, when it comes to running. :) As far as the movement of waves, the fact is that light waves travel in a straight line from point A to point B (although in space light being bent due to a massive gravitational source). About stories that move in arcs, I must say that it's a bit blurry concept for me. Why not in circles or zig-zag lines? How to represent such an idea graphically? For me, a story moves forward to the end pulling readers along.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#50
I agree with you Zacharias \ud83d\udc1d Voulgaris to your comment

Zacharias 🐝 Voulgaris

#48
In my experience, the S-curve is a more realistic representation of progress, be it in a business project or in the learning of an A.I. agent. Perhaps there is a certain universality to this, when it is properly defined mathematically. Nevertheless, straight lines have their role to play too, even if they are not as realistic at describing real-world phenomena.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#48
I don't dispute the shortest distance is a straight line dear Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic indicated in his comment. Falcons and other birds take an arc path. Other examples include, and there are many more in the comments here and on LinkedIn, storytelling. Stories would be boring if moved in a straight line. There shall be no ups and downs and no struggle or conflict. I thank you for your concise comment.

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

2 years ago #42

I came late to this comment thread. To me, it's always a sign of the quality of a buzz that lasts longer than usual social media contents. The topic of the post is about the movement in straight or arc line, as well as about development or progress that follow such paths. There is no doubt that running in a straight line is the fastest path, especially for sprinters. Generally, running in a straight line between two points is a winning way because running in a curved path would add an extra distance. When running in an oval track, radius of curvature also makes the difference because smaller the radius runners must turn harder. An example of the curved path is an S-curve used in project management as a graphical tool for tracking the progress of a project over time. The curve displays cumulative data of the project against time, for example - project costs. At the beginning of the project costs are low, but during the execution, there is a rise in the cumulative costs. At the end of the project, costs tend to level off. Graphical representation of these data forms the S-like shape of the curve.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#46
Wonderful comment dear Tausif Mundrawala would enjoy reading it. I like your mention of the cardiology example. It is spot on. I do appreciate your mind.

Liesbeth Leysen, MSc. beBee Global Brand Ambassador
Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#43
If you do please tag me

Liesbeth Leysen, MSc. beBee Global Brand Ambassador

#42
yes, so true, it Always inspires me, so many lessons learned and still to come thank you Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#40
Nature is a wise master. Very-well said . This is a good title for a buzz.

Liesbeth Leysen, MSc. beBee Global Brand Ambassador

Always choose the most rewarding path

Liesbeth Leysen, MSc. beBee Global Brand Ambassador

great article and so love the topic Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee nature is truly a wise master to all of us

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#38
I admire your ability dear David Navarro L\u00f3pez to express your ideas in simple form no matter how complex the idea could be. Great comment and I truly appreciate its comprehensiveness.

David Navarro LΓ³pez

David Navarro LΓ³pez

2 years ago #33

In maths or physics, a straight line is the shortest way from A to B, but in life, I agree that an arc is more profitable, as there is no way to go straight. The problem might appear if while making an arc on your pursue of point b, you lose the sight of it. As in the falcon example, going around doesn't mean somebody is missing his target. Just adapting the flight to the possibilities at hand. Thank you for this buzz

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#36
Only recently this fact has been revealed by research Claire L Cardwell

Claire L Cardwell

Claire L Cardwell

2 years ago #31

I never knew that a falcon flew in a spiral pattern that is before it goes in for the kill. Fascinating facts as ever Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee!

Claire L Cardwell

Claire L Cardwell

2 years ago #30

#31
Chris \ud83d\udc1d Guest - I certainly hope so!

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#31
I agree dear Chris \ud83d\udc1d Guest

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#30
Claire L Cardwell- great example of how we see things in a way that they aren't what really they are. I loved the stretched hand example. I recall your buzz and yes, you are spot on. So, things look differently to our eyes from distance, angle of view and now you add rate of movement. May be the falcon cheats its prey to see the falcon flying in a straight line from distance when in fact it is flying in a curve.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#29
I wrote a buzz on illusion and how our eyes deceive us from seeing things as they are dear Franci\ud83d\udc1dEugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador. Besides, things look differently from distances and sometimes we see arcs as straight lines from distance. So, your quote is apt and reflects reality.

Claire L Cardwell

Claire L Cardwell

2 years ago #26

Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee - great buzz! I am reminded of seeing an outstretched hand reaching for something that was in slow motion, although it looks as though the person is reaching out in a straight line, seeing it in slow motion you can see that constant corrections are made - just like the bees mentioned earlier. And of course the hand and arm are not composed of straight lines (either on a macro or micro level!) I wrote a piece recently on round houses and why they are more efficient than houses built out of straight lines, I hope to start designing more houses with curves and round houses in the future!

Franci 🐝Eugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador

#28
Thank you Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee, and I realize I tend to oversimplify things - comes from my insurance underwriting days. With that said, this quote comes to mind β€œWe don’t see things as they are, we see them as we are.” Anais Nin

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#27
This is a great summary of the main idea of the buzz dear Franci\ud83d\udc1dEugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador. The rainbow arc is an example by which nature operates.

Franci 🐝Eugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador

IMO, straight lines are only on paper. Mentally and physically, we don't exist in a straight line. Nature is not in a straight line nor is the universe. The arc offers flexibility which is undoubtedly needed in this ever-changing world.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#25
It is an amazing example dear Chris \ud83d\udc1d Guest. You are spot on. n swimmer realizes the value of your comment and its credibility. Yes, we need to go in arc shapes in many situations.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#19
Preston \ud83d\udc1d Vander Ven. You wrote "...we see that its surface is made up of smooth waves or ripples". This comment is sound because it draws the attention of the reader to the shape-distance relationship. This is worthy of further study. Thank you for the inspiration.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#18
CityVP \ud83d\udc1d Manjit. I think she will have a better response to your educated comment. Thanks for the link as well

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#16
John Rylance- it is interesting that you wrote "Forager bees report back to the hive re pollen. Bees then fly "straight" to the source". Mind you falcons follow an arc path to keep an eye on their prey while flying. When the falcon decides it is the right moment to catch the prey it then takes a straight line with an amazing speed so that the prey wouldn't have the opportunity to flee.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#15
This is an interesting observation @Bill and is a subtle one too. Amazingly, Debasish Majumder wrote a poem and I believe as an inspiration from this buzz.His poem "STRAIGHT OR ARC? AN AMAZING FUSS!" starts by reading "Straight or wavy" https://www.bebee.com/producer/@debasish-majumder-ambassador-bebee-com/straight-or-arc-an-amazing-fuss He should be equally happy with your comment as much as I am. I am going to explore your comment in more detail.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#14
well-said dear Clau Valerio. I am in agreement with your comment. Moving in a straight line is a form of linear thinking, which isn't capable of dealing with complexity.

CityVP Manjit

CityVP Manjit

2 years ago #16

It is interesting to see the significance of the spatial relationship with an arc and the structural relationship with an arch. One architect in San Fransisco challenges the box or rectangle designs is Eugene Tssui. He goes back to nature to compliment his design genius, but interestingly he has a hard time to get approval for his architectural designs. His designs challenge the conditioning of boxed minds and squared beliefs - so much so that people get very angry if he is building anything in their area of residence. Yet he is very practical in his design, even if they alarm those who only see homes in a particular shape bias. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hrl5WY8cdHo

CityVP Manjit

CityVP Manjit

2 years ago #15

It is interesting to see the significance of the spatial relationship with an arc and the structural relationship with an arch. One architect in San Fransisco challenges the box or rectangle designs is Eugene Tsui. He goes back to nature to compliment his design genius, but interestingly he has a hard time to get approval for his architectural designs. His designs challenge the conditioning of boxed minds and squared beliefs - so much so that people get very angry if he is building anything in their area of residence. Yet he is very practical in his design, even if they alarm those who only see homes in a particular shape bias. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hrl5WY8cdHo

John Rylance

John Rylance

2 years ago #14

"Making a bee line for"  Forager bees report back to the hive re pollen. Bees then fly "straight" to the source.  Actually they stop and hover on route and make alterations to their "flight path".  When we throw, kick, fire etc. towards a target, we think the projectile goes in a straight line.  Often due to other factors like wind for bullets arrows footballs and so on. 

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#12
This is a lovely contribution to the discussions dear Jerry. I loved what your instructor taught you. I wonder how many constructors shared the same, but I doubt if it were many. Yes, for practical reasons, the arc is the shortest and most practical. This is what nature teaches us.

Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

2 years ago #12

Dr. Ali, In one of my first drawing classes I recall the instructor saying, "There are no straight lines in nature. To draw an edge requires you to show the intersection of two planes of different values. A line is a construct of the mind." As you say, what we see often looks simple but in the end is complex. Our minds are marvelous things but arcs are often the shortest distance between two points on this small blue marble floating in space.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#10
Cheers for the very insightful comment from an the experienced Zacharias \ud83d\udc1d Voulgaris. You express your wealthy experiences in data modeling and I consider your comment as an integral part of this buzz. Thank you

Zacharias 🐝 Voulgaris

"Lines always curvy, straight lines only on paper" to quote the lyrics of a quite insightful song (originally in Greek). It's intriguing how straight lines are essential for understanding our world, through our most basic models, but when it's time to create more advanced models that reflect it more accurately, we always resort to non-linear models. This is quite evident both in complex system and even human creations like data science models and architectural designs. Cheers for the insightful post!

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#8
Thank you dear Debasish Majumder for your unfailing support. It sounds strange that linear movement isn't the best in a complex world. We can't deal with complexity with either linear thinking or movement.

Debasish Majumder

Debasish Majumder

2 years ago #8

if we follow our movement intently, we can evidently observe that we too move in a spiral manner. our feet too move in an arc fashion. linear is perhaps the vision which we visualize in order to short cut our available complexities or to get rid of the spiral order which sometimes having the upward as well downward trend in a continuous changing fashion which we experience in our arc of life cycle. however, wonderful insight sir Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee! enjoyed read immensely and shared. thank you for the buzz sir.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#6
Thank you Debesh Choudhury. Like i said, in complex world with many interconnections, straight line commenting is unable to meet the complex requirements.

Debesh Choudhury

Debesh Choudhury

2 years ago #6

Good title to ponder, it is as impossible as for beBee to improve its commenting interface! You and many of us here would agree with me. We can't yet edit the comments. The comments remain "one after another". So we can't make out which one is a reply or reference to which comment. In a sense the commenting system of beBee is like "straight line" - connecting all the comments one after another.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Very true, Changing environments require different adaptations and movements

Pascal Derrien

Pascal Derrien

2 years ago #4

add u-turns. set backs and other pauses including fly overs and underground cover and you get the rhythm of life

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Javier \ud83d\udc1d beBee- I am keen to know if you find that beBee is growing in a straight liner, or as an arc.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Javier \ud83d\udc1d beBee- I am keen to know if you find that beBee is growing r, or in an arc.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

CityVP \ud83d\udc1d Manjit- you are mentioned in this buzz

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