To know or not to know

To know or not to know

It is amazing how ideas branch out when sequentially carried by different authors. Two years ago I published a presentation on fractal management and the use of fractal why questions. Sara Jacobovici got inspired and wrote a brilliant post on why questions and ended it by saying that only humans ask why. William King questioned if knowing sometimes take the peace of mind away. This question prompted Anees Zeidi to write a post titled "That Noble 'Soul'" in which he concluded "I wish I could meet that noble β€˜soul’ in person to say a big β€˜Thank you’ in helping me find my β€˜why to live’".

It is now my turn to try to answer the question- are we better of sometimes not to know because knowing may disturb our lives. This might sound as an easy question, but trying to answer it proved challenging.

In trying to know you might end up in knowing less. This I would call The Knowledge Uncertainty Principle. If we locate very accurately the position of electron, then we know very little about its velocity. What we gain we lose somewhere else. The reverse is true. The more the velocity of an electron (knowledge), the less we know about its position. With knowledge coming fast, no wonder finding its "position" with certainty is becoming like an impossible dream.

This can be very stressful. We are orbiting around a topic that we wish to discover more about, but only ultimately to know less. I find that the quote of Tony Robins β€œThe quality of your life is in direct proportion to the amount of uncertainty you can comfortably deal with” is very true. We want to know, but it is becoming difficult to know with certainty. This leads to what I call the " Uncertainty Stress ". Either we accept uncertainty as a norm or we shall suffer from its stress and could burn us out. Dr. Amy Johnson wrote " Rather than turning your frantic thoughts into concrete, allow them to float by as if on water. Encourage mental movement so that better thoughts can eventually float in" . Uncertainty requires us to have flowing attitudes and even if they turn into a concrete we should try to float them. We do this with limestone. It is heavy and sinks in water. However; if we coat it with a fatty lubricant it floats. We need to keep our attitudes fatty so that they don't sink in uncertainty.

When we face uncertainty we suffer from unknowing. Sometimes we stretch our imagination, power and attitudes to try to know more. Other times we fold into ourselves fearing the unknown. Like we fold and stretch flour dough, we stretch our thoughts, attitudes and actions. The stretching and folding repeated cycles produce strange attractors. We produce inside us a butterfly effect in which a small change in attitude, beliefs, values or actions may take us into unpredictable paths. We become part of the uncertainty that we created inside us. See the video below to visualize the stretching and folding of strange attractors.

We need calming periods and stop the folding of the dough inside us. We need to sense our position. We need to accept that we are on a long discovery journey. No matter how much we know a little change in our knowledge might take us into unknown destinies. We ask why only to find out that the why scales up into greater whys.

Plants teach us a lot. Their roots walk into the unknown, but they adapt, change their shape, behavior, entanglement and even establish symbiotic relationship with algae to survive. They don't care that they don't know. They might stop growing for a while to breathe and learn to adapt and grow again.

The roots of knowing are realizing that we shall never know precisely. Either we stretch with hope or fold with fear of the uncertainty.


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Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#34
Much grateful to your ssuring comment Gert Scholtz

Gert Scholtz

Gert Scholtz

5 years ago #22

Ali Anani An intriguing post which reminds me of the words of F Scott Fitzgerald: The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposing ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function. Thank you Dr Ali.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#32
I am indeed happy that you foind the buzz usefulJames McElearney. Thank You

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#30
All I can say that your comment shall be on my mind without even having to write it and spot it on the entrance wall. I appreciate yur so motivating comment.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#16
Thank you Hafida Benyoucef

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#18
Thank you Lisa Gallagher- sometimes little nudges make big differences. Again, your great comment shall be addressed in my next buzz. I do hope to then read your thoughts. I do

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#17
Please read my buzz of today (to publish soon) and in particular to the section on Middle Knowledge my friend Anees Zaidi

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Thank you dear Diane Schultz for your support and appreciation

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#14
Dear Mohammed Mohammed Sultan- great thoughts and again my nexy buzz will address your point directly and indirectly. Thank you

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#13
Anees Zaidi- you wrote "We need to add some coolant to control the heat and make the universe a calm and peaceful place for our kid". Love the metaphor and the idea. Great thinking and visualization

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#12
Sara Jacobovici- you wrote "By the way, thank you for the title of a future Buzz; The β€œneed to sense our position.” I tell you for sure you have something relevant in my new buzz (will publish in one hour). There is something for you

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#11
Yes, correct you are Sara Jacobovici as ignorance is different from unknowing. Thanks for clearly explaining the difference.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#10
Thank you Sara Jacobovici. I think I need to write three posts to answer your powerful comments. For now, I am very happy that we are stretching each other's mind (and soon, fold each other) also that new ideas may immerge. Your grasp of the post is so deep that I don't know what to say. May be my next buzz will answer some of your great points.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#8
Absolutley- and the spell of calmness is what we may be in need of now more than any other time.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#7
Deb Helfrich control or no control- or something in between. Later today I am posting a buzz on ""Being in the Middle" Dilemma" and I am responding to your comment and dedicating the buzz to you. Thank you for the spark

Lisa Gallagher

Lisa Gallagher

5 years ago #8

Enjoyed reading this post Ali Anani. There are many times I face this- "When we face uncertainty we suffer from unknowing. Sometimes we stretch our imagination, power and attitudes to try to know more. Other times we fold into ourselves fearing the unknown. " That is anxiety when it heightens. A disease that many have little control over. Yes, there are tools but it can take years to reprogram our brains to think differently. I think the ideas you propose are wonderful and worth repeating and practicing. Every little truth we learn is another step towards healing. Thank you for this.

Sara Jacobovici

Sara Jacobovici

5 years ago #7

Part 3: I have just let my ideas spill out Dr. Ali but each time I return to your Buzz and read about the electron and its position and velocity or about floating our ideas and lubricating them with a fatty lubricant, or folding and stretching like flour dough or the roots of plants walking into the unknown, inspires me to β€œstretch with hope”. By the way, thank you for the title of a future Buzz; The β€œneed to sense our position.”

Sara Jacobovici

Sara Jacobovici

5 years ago #6

Part 2: Thought Number Two: β€œIgnorance is bliss.” is a phrase coined by Thomas Gray in his Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College. (1700’s). This too is an interesting descriptor. It is often used to refer to someone who does not know of pain or suffering and in this way is always happy. How would this apply to other forms of ignorance? From my perspective you cannot consider not knowing and ignorance as having anything to do with one another. The unknown is linked to experience while ignorance is a state of being. One chooses to be ignorant, while one waits for the opportunity to make the unknown experiences familiar. Last Thought (for now): F. Scott Fitzgerald said, β€œThe test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.” I think we turn to knowing as comfort. When we become distressed with uncertainty we lose knowing. The paradox then becomes, we can know more than one thing differently and still be in the know. The measurement is in our ability to function.

Sara Jacobovici

Sara Jacobovici

5 years ago #5

Part 1: First, I echo William King on your Buzz. Second, I need to say that your work takes my breath away. I am writing my comment on a document page first because I do not trust that I will be able to communicate accurately what I gained from your work directly into the comment box. This is a piece that pulls together and expands your ideas in a fractal way. Your use of metaphors and images is breathtaking (another breath). I cannot at this time unravel it all so I will express those ideas that have emerged after a couple of readings. Thought number One: You write, β€œIn trying to know you might end up in knowing less. This I would call The Knowledge Uncertainty Principle. β€œ I see this as a sign of the times; we have access to so much information yet we end up knowing less and becoming uncertain and distressed. In comparison with the comfort that philosophers like Socrates had in not knowing; β€œβ€œThe only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.” ― Socrates.

Sara Jacobovici

Sara Jacobovici

5 years ago #4

Part 1: First, I echo @william king’s gratitude for being mentioned along with him and @Anees on your Buzz. Second, I need to say that your work takes my breath away. I am writing my comment on a document page first because I do not trust that I will be able to communicate accurately what I gained from your work directly into the comment box. This is a piece that pulls together and expands your ideas in a fractal way. Your use of metaphors and images is breathtaking (another breath). I cannot at this time unravel it all so I will express those ideas that have emerged after a couple of readings. Thought number One: You write, β€œIn trying to know you might end up in knowing less. This I would call The Knowledge Uncertainty Principle. β€œ I see this as a sign of the times; we have access to so much information yet we end up knowing less and becoming uncertain and distressed. In comparison with the comfort that philosophers like Socrates had in not knowing; β€œβ€œThe only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.” ― Socrates.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#5
This is an insightful comment debasish majumder. I love the connection to the mother-baby and it is quite revealing.Is yur next ost philosoophy-related. I think you are fully apt to express philosophy in poetry.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#2
My dear Anees Zaidi- the feelings are mutual for sure

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#1
Thank you my dear Anees Zaidi. Your work is prominent and it is not a favor to mention it. It is of high quality and merits much more discussions

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