Do we need marketing plans?

Do we need marketing plans?

· I searched for predictions and marketing forecasts that went off the mark and the reasons behind their failure. I got amazed by the falling numbers such as less than one thousand laptops will be sold in the Year 2000. Other forecasts include “Population will inevitably and completely outstrip whatever small increases in food supplies we make,” Paul Ehrlich confidently declared in the April 1970 issue of Mademoiselle. “The death rate will increase until at least 100-200 million people per year will be starving to death during the next ten years.”

· Ecologist Kenneth Watt declared, “By the year 2000, if present trends continue, we will be using up crude oil at such a rate…that there won’t be any more crude oil. You’ll drive up to the pump and say, `Fill ‘er up, buddy,’ and he’ll say, `I am very sorry, there isn’t any.'”

· There’s no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share.” Steve Ballmer, Microsoft CEO

· “There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home.” Ken Olson, president Digital Equipment Corp (1977)

· "I think there is a world market for maybe five computers. "Thomas Watson, president of IBM, 1943

· "With over 50 foreign cars already on sale here, the Japanese auto industry isn't likely to carve out a big slice of the U.S. market." business magazine on August 2, 1968.

These are examples of what I found in the extensive coverage of wrong predictions. 

Recently, my friend Zacharias Voulgaris notified me of a great post by Gary-Gregoire Coquillo that immediately captured my attention. The post discusses Design Thinking The following discussions were rich, versatile and varied in their focal points. I accepted the invitation of Zacharias to write a post on this post. I responded by writing in parts of my comment the following. The author welcomed my intention to write this post.

My initial thoughts brought resulted in my list of points of discussion. Here they are as these thoughts emerged:

· Understanding customers is a complex process

· Understanding Customer Experience

· Weather analogy and predictability

· Repeat customer behavior patterns

· The butterfly effect of customers’ sentiments and behavior

· Volatility of customers’ behavior

· The dynamism of customers’ behaviors, and

· Customers’ behavior importation


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The above discussion points don’t work in isolation as they feedback to each other resulting in the complexity of human behaviors. I want to emphasize here that repeated habits of customers result in shaping their behaviors. So, when I talk about behaviors same would apply to habits.

The investors in stock markets result in 8-form wave fractal waves that we observe in stock markets anywhere and at any time. Shares don’t form the waves because they don’t trade; it is human investors who trade and their behaviors show this repeated wave patterns. Customers invest in what they buy. In a sense they are investors. So, like it is impossible to predict the weather for more than 80% accuracy for the next three days it is likewise very difficult to predict demands for products because of the volatility of customer behaviors. Social media has accelerated this widespread volatility making the climate of marketing very similar to weather forecast. Both weather forecast and customer “weather of behavior” are subject to the butterfly effect. Small changes in sentiments may lead to widely varying demand for a product or service.

Marketing forecasts are analogous to weather forecasts- both are subject to the butterfly effect

The above ideas find support in literature. In 2010, Australian airliner QANTAS first felt the brunt of social media’s inclination to trust “straight from the horse’s mouth” sources when a misinformed tweet about a plane crashing in Indonesia lead to false media reports and a huge drop in the company’s share price. The market for a brand of cigarettes dropped sharply because of a rumor that male smokers of that brand lost their fertility. The rumor spread like fire in the region and the brand was withdrawn from the market. Both examples are what I call behavior volatility 0780594a.jpg

The recent example of the disruptive effects of the corona virus on the activities of the fashion sector is still a living one. The butterfly effect in this field has played on both wings of the butterfly, Fashion houses who manufacture in China seeking cheap labor suffered from the interruption of production. This was later coupled with the spread of the virus in Italy and France. All promotional activities were canceled and the manufacturer experienced huge losses. The increased interconnectivity worldwide has exposed the markets forecasters with huge challenges to make any reasonable prediction for market demands for even a month.

The “social importation” of fashions from one country to other countries is an example of the rapidity of spread of “social jealousy” and thus enhancing the effects of one country on the importing countries.

The widespread of sentiments which propel customers to favor one product over other competing products is also subject to the butterfly effect. The heat of competition and the social mockery pressures may phase out a product completely from the market. These factors are analogous to the weather pressure and temperature which make weather subject to the butterfly effect. The Nova car was phased out because of its name in Portuguese-speaking countries. The mockery in the name Nova (meaning the car that doesn’t go) made customers shy out from buying or even driving the car.

As much as the technology changes customers’ behaviors; they also change the need for simulations of market demands sensitive to the volatility of these sentiments. Simulation models need to cater for these sentiments and their abrupt effect on demands. This is a challenging task for all parties involved.

These are my initial thoughts and your comments are welcome.


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Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#39
It shall be interesting to compare what nations have done/will do and conclude some general lessons, hopefully.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

1 year ago #33

#38
The "choosing" part is what divides us here in the US. Where do you place the proverbial pivot point within the care/enable see-saw? Politically each side is wanting it all the way at their end. Typically something in the middle is what really happens. But this process of extremes has drawn the voter class of folks into division. Interesting discussion here.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#35
I concur fully with your comment Harvey Lloyd. I particular, your reference to cognitive dissonance that make people have two opposite beliefs and actions. The choice s here are indeed enable or caring. The problem is further complicated with the cost of caring. In Jordan, for example, the officials' first priority was caring, but then gradually it is turning to enabling partially. Many businesses have been allowed to reopen, but only with 30% of their work force. So, there is some balance between the two opposites.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#34
#36 Jerry Fletcher Interesting contrast this is indeed. John wrote "But, the people who build small businesses are always more resilient than the bureaucracies. Harvey responded "we have recognized that the "small" businesses of less than 1 'm in revenue were the most impacted.". In principle, small businesses are less rigid than the big ones and so they have more agility to adapt. However; very big shocks may just create total chaos and small businesses will find it difficult to adapt. Disruptive events are different from moderate ones and are more demanding. The following months will will be telling.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

1 year ago #30

#34
In a discussion concerning this very topic of small business we have recognized that the "small" businesses of less than 1m in revenue were the most impacted. Their payroll and profits were most likely close to salary level returns for the owners. The discussion lead to the observation that in economic and now health crisis it appears that the more conservative business owners are always the worst hit. While the policy makers, data collectors and government employees seem to be unaffected. It appears that private enterprise is the only sector who had lay offs, furloughs and business closures. The public entities have had none that i have been made aware. This health crisis though will present some very deep hardship in the public sector. We have three counties in our area already discussing 10-20% pay cuts across the board. Several counties have already laid off all non essential personnel. IMHO this is why the left is wanting to prop up state budgets. But the private sector has also reaped many benifits from the government tree also.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

1 year ago #29

#34
In all landscapes of everyday life, inclusive of the times we find ourselves, we can choose to enable a fear of a group or stop at reasonable care. An errant employee, or Virus data interpretation (Assumptions.), and other choices always adjust between enabling and caring. These two words are place holders between the emotions of offering help and the reality of whats possible. The two words are central in cognitive dissonance. We need to get back to work and salvage what is left within the economy. Yet i do not want to be the one that brings, spreads or creates untenable circumstances to others. Being the leader of an organization i can make choices that rush opening our business. At least to employees. The leadership position has become untenable as the caring aspect of the current situation has overblown the reality. This much is proven in the reaction vs outcome of state leader choices across the US. While we enable the fears of those collecting and presenting data, we are also not caring about the individual who is losing their business, or employee that needs to have weekly income. We were very fortunate to be cash heavy when this broke, two months earlier and it would have been a different story. I am not for one side or the other. I merely present the see-saw and the pivot point of caring vs enabling.

Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

1 year ago #28

#27
Harvey. Good questions. Ones I have not wrapped my mind around. I'm not sure what you mean by "the line between caring and enabling." the Coroanvirus has caused a real quandry. When do we give up sheltering in place? How far into a financial depression do we allow the world to sink? When does the life of business trump resident;s lives? Has the time come when conservative business ideals are swept aside by egalitarianism? My bet is that small business which is the true driver of the economy, lacking the resources of the Fortune 1000 and the power to sway politicians will suffer will have a death curve that makes the virus look like a picnic. But, the people who build small businesses are always more resilient than the bureaucracies. That is our only hope. And so it goes.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Thank you dear Debasish Majumder for your reshare.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#31
Agreed in full with this comment. Yes, we need people to be self-learn-learning and self-dependent within a caring environment. Like a good seed needs god soil and environment to grow oon its own. We don't want to be like babies cared for all the time.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

1 year ago #25

#29
Openness is a good trait and so is conservatism. Both at there extremes represent levels of risk. No you were on point as i believe you defined the word in your context. Taking "sides" within group dynamics does not lead to success. The group, however positioned, needs to move from point A to point B. If A&B fight at each other the distance between A&B grows exponentially. This defined between the two opposites of compromise verses synergy. Compromise is sometimes the only hope we have. But synergy is what harnesses the groups diverse thinking about the problem, not each others position. In our school we always have to define the line between the emotions of care verses enabling. This goes along with the anti-fragile you have discussed. Care places students with disabilities inside an accommodating state that may or may not be reproduced in adulthood. So executing around performance with anti-fragile plus care offers the student to fail in a caring environment where they are encouraged to succeed. In the school many of our new staff struggle with this concept. They believe that you can care someone to success. Without the realization they are establishing an artificial environment that the student can only survive with them in it. What happens when the student returns to the community of their peers without the staff member? A delicate balance of performance for our school and staff.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#27
In noway I concur with forcing because I believe in persuasion and convincing. I was questioning if politicians adopt this method. Like any performance to reach a high level it has to come from within. This is the desirability part of the equation.Forcing people may even decrease their desire to do something and get less engaged.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#26
You know I am your student when it comes to personality traits. All what I know well is that I took the test several times and invariably I scored very high on openness.It is my dominant trait. So, I might be biased to open policies and the like. The definition of Neuroticism and this is my understanding about it. Please correct my understanding if it went wild.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

1 year ago #22

#17
...."forcing individuals to adopt a more caring attitude toward the culture." I would be interested in reading your thoughts on where the line between caring and enabling exists, if it exists at all. This has always been a challenge in my thinking. Specifically as it applies to the political environment we find ourselves. Another way to put it, where does my responsibility end and yours begin? Companies each day make this choice under warranties and customer service. They can enable customers by giving away the farm on one end, and lose customers as the warranty never provides any after the sale value, on the other. This is an interesting challenge as we appear to have two very different thoughts on this balance.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

1 year ago #21

#24
If i am interpreting your definition of Neuroticism as it applies to US politics then, yes. Not only a role but a dominant role. But wouldn't this be true for any large organization that has lost its equilibrium? The potential for Neuroticism or debate are the only selections. My personal opinion is related to the full flushing out of "Branding". I believe that branding is a way to get folks to try/loyal (to) your product/service. But it is also manipulative. Branding is not giving facts and specifications for comparison in decision making. It is harnessing one's emotions of group selection. Nike, "Be like Mike" "Just do it". Seems benign on the surface. But now politics has discovered this powerful tool along with groups that identify along a certain policy belief. Through branding we have cast everyone who is not within a specific social group as xenophobes, homophobes, fascist and many other labels. When it is not the groups that are disliked but rather the advantage they seek in identification. 42% of America identifies with the right group(s) while 42% are outside of any group with negative labels. Identity groups are a form of Neuroticism, IMHO. Unfortunately these groups are being wielded like a sword by both political parties.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#23
Amazing as Takata disappeared because of the airbag problem that led to the greatest recall of sold cars in history, to my knowledge. Still, brand pride wins.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#20
Great analysis. However; being an outsider of the politics in the USA, I wonder if Neuroticism isn't playing a role. Tension may anger people who are dominant in their Big 5. I say this because of people who have dominance in this trait tend to moody, angry and may take extreme decisions that would care the least to keep the balance of the pyramid and mostly those at the bottom of it.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

1 year ago #18

#21
Yes, Confirmation Bias is a huge marketing tool within the Big 5. Through bias reinforcement i can gain brand commitment. Subaru is one of my favorite commercials to get mad within media. Clearly targeting X & Y generations they expose a lifestyle of grand children engaging with grand parents in some bonding moment or parents watching their children ride off into the college scene. Confirming biases that already exist within shared social constructs, already presented by other marketers. What amazes me most is how those that own the products actaully believe the lifestyle. Usually when i bump into a Subaru driver i ask if Takata fixed their airbag problems? I get the quizzical look or an angry stare as i have upset the branding already in place. Yes a little sadistic social fun. I don't do it often;) With identity groups you can very quickly obtain the biases they all share. But even more sinister is you can use group dynamics to establish lines of group expelling. So to a conservative now, any openness is fair game to establish you are a liberal and visa versa for the liberal.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

1 year ago #17

A good example of the openness tension between Conservatives and Liberals is the financial statements. On the extremes, conservatives will sacrifice personnel for the bottom line, while liberals would have us list personnel on the balance sheet as assets. This tension between the extremes is what forces good companies to develop win-win strategies. Well, at least those who realize that liberals and conservatives need each other.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#19
Excellent comment and it brings the issue of the conflict between two groups with different and opposing traits. This tension if swayed to one extreme then we are in a state of far from equilibrium and a new balance needs to emerge. If not, what you described ably in your comment Harvey Lloyd."If the top of the pyramid does not insure the success of the lower parts the system comes apart: This analysis is consistent with your thought that "Group dynamics always starts with the individual". It is the interactions among individuals within certain rules that generates the group dynamics. I recall that we scratched the surface of this dynamics when you and I exchanged comments on your latest post "Confirmation Bias 11).

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

1 year ago #15

President Trump is answering the openness question that 42% of the voters state has gone to far. No i don't agree with his methods or demeanor. But his election was based on conservatives feeling exposed physically and fiscally. Identity politics has gone so far as to now be eating itself. Those that created the various groups are now being eaten by other groups who claim superiority (The hierarchy developing). Conservatives mostly disagree with the concept of groups greater than the individual. What does this mean in the are of marketing in America? Right now openness is a big issue. 42% of voters say close it all down, while 42% say open it up. (The missing 18% are the independents that now control our election cycles.) We no longer market to the masses, we market to demographics and various understandings of the Big 5. This marketing style of group dynamics tends to isolate one group when considering others. Before all this started product and service related marketing built on value, specifications, convenience and other things like accessibility. Once this got left behind and all imported into lifestyle marketing the Big 5 became very dominant in considering group dynamics and target market. Politics leverages this well. Are you better off than 5 years ago?; What have you got to loose?; A rising tide lifts all boats. The larger question, How do you unwind this identity group dynamics, where mini civil wars play out in media all day?

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

1 year ago #14

Group dynamics always starts with the individual. By this we can understand that their the "Big 5" personality traits. Openness, Conscientiousness, Extroversion, Agreeableness. Neuroticism. Within in any group you can have any individual who is leaning on one of these traits within a marketing effort. I wanted to give some group dynamic context to statements in #18. Liberals tend towards openness and conservatives tend towards conscientiousness (Justice and protection of what you have). We cant have either side "win" the battle. The tension between these two groups is a marker of success. America before the entry into WWII conservatives were on top and the openness to new experiences were shutdown. Bernie Sanders represents a rise of openness (and other factors) that makes conservatives shiver. His rise to any level of prominence shows that openness has gain the advantage. We can not stop hierarchy's from forming, someone or group will always emerge on top. This leaves us with the question of those who are at the base of the pyramid? What to do? Stalin and Hitler used the bottom of the pyramid to change the top. Unfortunately the bottom never realized what was promised. The tension between conservatives and liberals presents, both sides are right. If the top of the pyramid does not insure the success of the lower parts the system comes apart. If government attempts to level the pyramid the motivation to grow and climb will be for a aristocratic few, establishing a insiders pyramid that even more are at the bottom.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#17
Jerry Fletcher Dear Jerry- I am preparing my next post and it is about how nature make use of irritants and what humans do. Yes, Hitler and Stalin had supporters around them to do what they did. Today, it is parties that is lead by a president. This brings more questions to my mind and they are drawn from your comment here "we allow narcissists to hold high office". Why do we elect them? Are the masses so badly misled? Is it a morality problem. Lack of knowledge? Care only for the emotional speeches of narcissists? Care only for short-term results? Or,is it total misunderstandings? Time will tell

Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

1 year ago #12

#15
DR. Ali, Read CityVP Manjit's post. What all of us must acknowledge is that beauty can come from an irritant. The pearl is probably the best known example. There are ways to modify the behavior of all animals including humans but the needed modifications implied by his observations apply more to cultures than individuals. The problem is that individual behavior does not control group behavior regardless of size of the group. A mob acts as a mob whether it is a handful of people or a country. In Germany, the irritant was Hitler. In the USSR it was Stalin. We are seeing similar irritants in the political sphere today across the world as fascism rears its ugly head and we allow narcissists to hold high office. The Coronavirus has served as a wild card forcing individuals to adopt a more caring attitude toward the culture. The idea of a "New Normal" when the all clear sounds seems to have become a cultural meme. the question is, "Will it require removal of he irritants?" And so it goes.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#13
CityVP Manjit Great thoughts again. One thought is "Conspiracy theorists and imaginations of evil men making calculated plans to control us is way more sexier to think about than incompetence:. Yes, again it is the irritation of control. I wish those politicians and marketers would read your before-mentioned post on this post and how you defined control as a pearl to take us to wisdom. I wonder that you mentioned in your comment an irritant that was not mentioned in your post on Pearls. It is what you wrote here "why would we give very complex financial and economic decisions and put them in the hands of politicians, who are given charge to create policies that they do not understand or at least are not in the best position to oversee:. I mean political irritants, or if you wish ignorance irritants. Even worse- the half-informed irritant because those who know little tend to think they know it all.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#14
Jerry Fletcher Thanks Jerry for your excellent thoughts. I loved what you say and in particular"You can influence it but you cannot control it. Other factors can and do influence it:. I have had a discussion with CityVP Manjit as he wrote a post on my post about pearls. It is a big irritant to try to control the uncontrollable. The oysters, which turn the irritant sand to pearl, don't try to control the invading sand; rather it influences it to make pearls. The irritation of technology by throwing us into new habits, new lifestyles, new values, new relations and new applications are big irritants of change. Some people choose to prevent their sands from infiltrating in such as avoiding the electric car and still prefer to the less efficient hybrid cars. WE don't get anything for nothing. It is accepting that we mayn't control changes and mainly due to new technologies, and realizing that we may influence them that shall make our plans and including marketing plans worthy.

Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

1 year ago #9

Dr. Ali, Marketing, like other activities based on the intent to modify and/or control human behavior is predicated by professional practicioners on being a best guess. Anyone who tells you differently is lying to you and possibly to themselves. Brand is probably the most observed phenomenon in this arena. I've said here before that you, your product or service will have a brand whether you want one or not. You can influence it but you cannot control it. Other factors can and do influence it. Fads and fashions can shift feelings toward it. Financial or political balance points can impact it. Anything that resonates in a culture to shift trust can change perceptions of your brand. Technology is the greatest disruptor when teamed with thinking that uses it to competitive advantage. That's why most of us don't rent DVDs of movies anymore at Blockbuster. Yet, there are still red box kiosks in food stores. there is little doubt that Electric vehicles are more efficient but given the choice Americans purchase hybrids and gas guzzlers instead. The best marketing plans have built into them plans for contingencies. Nobody foresaw the Coronavirus. But old timers, like me, used to build plans based on 3 different levels of inflation. Millenials I've mentioned this to had to have inflation defined for them! I've never met anyone that can predict the future. Industry figures with inflated egos urged on by reporters to gaze into crystal balls usually get it wrong. The glaring exception that comes to mind is George Gilder's predictions about the computer chip. And so it goes.

CityVP Manjit

CityVP Manjit

1 year ago #8

#8
What is important is the black swan events rather than geopolitical plans. While these nations are planning these big picture moves, they are clearly losing sight of that which they did not plan for and worse that they chose to be blind to because they are so fixed on their plans. With Toyota most people focus on their efforts identifying and eliminating waste from their production system (Muda) but very few focus on two very key pieces called Mura and Muri. Mura is variation and Toyota know that even flow is the best scenario. they also focus on Muri which is overburden, or identifying the stress to the system. https://www.cleverchecklist.com/blog/thoughts/mura-and-muri/ What we do not do is take these ideas up to the geopolitical level. That is why what Martin Armstrong identified as the blindspot in government policies, and what Nassim Taleb identified in Black Swans. Conspiracy theorists and imaginations of evil men making calculated plans to control us is way more sexier to think about than incompetence. So what I like about Martin Armstrong's message was why would we give very complex financial and economic decisions and put them in the hands of politicians, who are given charge to create policies that they do not understand or at least are not in the best position to oversee. Right now variation (Mura) is seismic and overburden (Muri) a catastrophic tragedy. So if I only consider marketing plans at the level of baked beans I only see farts. Variation and stress were not addressed at the highest level, and so now we are talking about making adjustments at the grassroots level, to causes that are rolls of a dice. God may not play dice with the universe but politicians do.

CityVP Manjit

CityVP Manjit

1 year ago #7

#8
What is important is the black swan events rather than geopolitical plans. While these nations are planning these big picture moves, they are clearly losing sight of that which they did not plan for and worse that they chose to be blind to because they are so fixed on their plans. With Toyota most people focus on their efforts identifying and eliminating waste from their production system (Muda) but very few focus on two very key pieces called Mura and Muri. Mura is variation and Toyota know that even flow is the best scenario. they also focus on Muri which is overburden, or identifying the stress to the system. https://www.cleverchecklist.com/blog/thoughts/mura-and-muri/ What we do not do is take these ideas up to the geopolitical level. That is why what Martin Armstrong identified as the blindspot in government policies, and what Nassim Taleb identified in Black Swans. Conspiracy theorists and imaginations of evil men making calculated plans to control us is way more sexier to think about than incompetence. So what I like about Martin Armstrong's message was why would give very complex financial and economic decisions and put them in the hands of politicians, who are given charge to create policies that they do not understand or at least are not in the best position to oversee. Right now variation (Mura) is seismic and overburden (Muri) a catastrophic tragedy. So if I only consider marketing plans at the level of baked beans I only see farts. Variation and stress were not addressed at the highest level, and so now we are talking about making adjustments at the grassroots level, to causes that are rolls of a dice. God may not play dice with the universe but politicians do.

CityVP Manjit

CityVP Manjit

1 year ago #6

#8
What is important is the black swan events rather than geopolitical plans. While these nations are planning these big picture moves, they are clearly losing sight of that which they did not plan for and worse that they chose to blind to because they are so fixed on their plans. With Toyota most people focus on their efforts identifying and eliminating waste from their production system (Muda) but very few focus on two very key pieces called Mura and Muri. Mura is variation and Toyota know that even flow is the best scenario. they also focus on Muri which is overburden, or identifying the stress to the system. https://www.cleverchecklist.com/blog/thoughts/mura-and-muri/ What we do not do is take these ideas up to the geopolitical level. That is why what Martin Armstrong identified as the blindspot in government policies, and what Nassim Taleb identified in Black Swans. Conspiracy theorists and imaginations of evil men making calculated plans to control us is way more sexier to think about than incompetence. So what I like about Martin Armstrong's message was why would give very complex financial and economic decisions and put them in the hands of politicians, who are given charge to create policies that they do not understand or at least are not in the best position to oversee. Right now variation (Mura) is seismic and overburden (Muri) a catastrophic tragedy. So if I only consider marketing plans at the level of baked beans I only see farts. Variation and stress were not addressed at the highest level, and so now we are talking about making adjustments at the grassroots level, to causes that are rolls of a dice. God may not play dice with the universe but politicians do.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#7
This is a wonderful dimension and is worthy of serious consideration. "Now if you answer those questions, the downstream effects of that political ignorance will find its way in greater unpredictability at the smallest unit there is which is a marketing plan"- this is true and you ask a question that have deep consequences. I don't know how China will adapt its marketing plans in face of the unexpected corona virus is a question of great interest to me. I don't know the time frame requirement for this adaptation to show results. I don't know much about marketing plans in china, but this is a topic that merits attention. Thank you CityVP Manjit for your comments that prompts the reader to think and rethink,

CityVP Manjit

CityVP Manjit

1 year ago #4

My starting point is the documentary about the Forecaster featuring an forecaster who the US government locked up for several years solely on contempt of court criteria - a 20 minute overview is here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxOUyPKA_vg What is important about Martin Armstrong is that be began asking very difficult and politically sensitive questions. His major premise is how governments have got used to using debt to get themselves out of crisis and the long-term consequences when that debt ceiling reaches a tipping point. His thesis is how do we as a society allow people to manage global economies on the basis of elected representation rather than supreme financial expertise. Now if you answer those questions, the downstream effects of that political ignorance will find its way in greater unpredictability at the smallest unit there is which is a marketing plan. How did the financial world get out of its debt burden from World War II, which itself was triggered by a debt burden? It created new money. It created the Bretton Woods Agreement in 1944. Wait, that is 1944 a year before World War II ended. Guess which country wants the next New World Order and is in the process of building new logistic pathways such as Silk Road, the Belt and Road Action Plan was released in 2015. https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/06/china-new-silk-road-explainer/ Does this mean that the world is coming to end? No. Yet there is a battle to establish a Newer World Order and for that to happen the current World Order established by Bretton Woods needs to crumble. China knows that, wants that and is planning 50 years ahead. How is that China can plan five decade ahead but a marketer in a modern business is not sure what will happen 5 months down the road? This circumventing of Bretton Woods is already happening.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#3
Oswaldo Enrique Diaz Delgado You have a unique perspeciive here 1.1 Response in a crystal glass with crystal clear water: Control thoughts, emotions, actions. 1.2 Answer in a glass with half-ink water: It generates doubts from thought, emotions disperse and actions disappear.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#1
Thank you dear Zacharias \ud83d\udc1d Voulgaris for your were the trigger to write this post by tagging me to the great post on Design Thinking. I look forward to read your insights with great interest.

Zacharias 🐝 Voulgaris

Zacharias 🐝 Voulgaris

1 year ago #1

This complex feedback loop, which is very similar to the work of a data scientist btw, is perhaps our best shot at dealing with the chaos of such complex systems as the market. Some would argue that it is our only shot. Thank you for your insights on this fascinating topic, Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee. My take on this is still brewing. Once it's ready, I'll be happy to share it. Cheers!

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