Living Stories on the Observing Effect

Living Stories on the Observing Effect

Humans are like plants as both are affected by the environment. If we place employees in a family-like environment their behaviors shall be different from placing them in a hostile environment. The environment affects the individual who in turn affects others. Soon, a polarization effect may appear on a debated issue. I wish to share two stories to explain the effect of observation on the behavior of individuals and groups. These are two stories that I witnessed and they are quite telling.

The first story happened while doing my PhD in the UK. A Greek friend who shared the same floor in the dormitory had his master thesis exam. Few of us were in the kitchen preparing a light meal. Meanwhile, our friend walked in the kitchen having just completed his viva. He was enraged because he didn't pass. He started shouting angrily "Ridigolous" instead of ridiculous. We laughed and that enraged him more. Instead of sympathizing with me you ridicule me- you are "ridigolous" too. Repeating "ridigolous" made us even laugh more. We failed to observe that his mounting threatening anger and suddenly he started throwing glassy articles on us. Acting from the combined feelings of failure and ridicule infuriated him and made our normally very calm friend to behave outside his "boundaries" and become a threat. We failed to observe his rage escalating. Once our friend started threatening us our behavior changed. Placing people under threat may cause them to behave in playing it safe (which we opted to), or face the threat.

The second story is related to an MD who was newly appointed in another country. In that country senior official was fond of horses and it happened that his most beloved horse got very sick. There was no veterinary doctor around. So, the owner of the hors consulted with an MD. The MD observing the love of the official for his horse and mixed with the fear the horse might die and this would threaten him reacted by saying "I am not a veterinary doctor" There were few MDs in that small city> SO, the official invited all of them and he received the same response. The MDs polarized to the same response. Finally, it was brought to the attention of the official that a new MD arrived (who is till today a friend of mine). The new MD knew that he would be scorned like other MDs if he responded similarly. So, when the official met with him he had a different response by accepting to treat the horse. The new MD idea was focused on finding a neutral treatment- something that can be given to horses and humans. He thought of multivitamin injection. He tried and in less than two hours the horse was on its feet running. The official rewarded him with a huge bonus.
Living Stories on the Observing Effect

These two stories show us how observing others may affect our decisions and behaviors. What prompted me to share this buzz is an article titled " Others' Anger Makes People Work Harder Not Smarter: The Effect of Observing Anger and Sarcasm on Creative and Analytic Thinking".In this article the authors find that The authors examine whether and how observing anger influences thinking processes and problem-solving ability. In 3 studies, the authors show that participants who listened to an angry customer were more successful in solving analytic problems, but less successful in solving creative problems compared with participants who listened to an emotionally neutral customer. In Studies 2 and 3, the authors further show that observing anger communicated through sarcasm enhances complex thinking and solving of creative problems. My two stories provide further illumination on the effect of increasing social exposure in an environment wherein negative feelings may prevail (first story) and turning negative exposure to a positive one (second story).

We need to observe what feelings our actions generate into others. These observations have drastic effects on our lives.



""
thumb_up Relevant message Comment
Comments
Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#46
Noticing and being curious are key- I couldn't agree more with you Deb Lange and myself developed the WPD Factor (Wonderness, Passion and Drive). Being curious is wonderment and is part of this factor. So, I am in full agreement with your comment.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#43
If one works on discarding negative perceptions/knowledge, will have a much "better gasoline"- great perspective dear David David Navarro L\u00f3pez

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#43
I have great respect for you my Navarro and I mean David David Navarro L\u00f3pez. This is unquestionable. Many times we follow the tide and agree on things that become so familiar to negate them. I respect your mind and your Navarro Loop. The fact I am still thinking and in spite of your lovely explanation is a pointer to the importance of your comment. Stay blessed my friend.

David Navarro LΓ³pez

David Navarro LΓ³pez

4 years ago #25

#42
Ali Anani. Thank you for your nice words,but I am just a normal person who tries to know more, learning from the bests. In my understanding, no doubt the feelings is "the engine". But beliefs is "the gasoline" you feed it with. If one works on discarding negative perceptions/knowledge, will have a much "better gasoline". Let us take as example your "reaction" to my post. I could take your words in negative aim. You are a very cultivated man, full of success, a living example of a human being. So these words coming from you, knowing that I come from a much more humble condition, could seem to me sarcastic. Thus I could think about your question "do feelings precede to beliefs...?" is trying to make laugh about me. Or with your words "your perspective.. is different from all others.." I could take it as if I am not in the line/should not be commenting here. But my perception ever since I first read your lines, is that you are a great human being, I acknowledged it, and i firmly belief that even if you heavily criticize me, my feelings would be of gratefulness, as a normal reaction of my feelings due to the perception I have from you. Perception-knowledge-beliefs-feelings-action-interaction-perception......I like the name of Navarro loop

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#41
I wish first to welcome the great mind and man dear friend David Navarro L\u00f3pez. We agree on some issues and we may disagree. No matter what David is a true thinker and human. I am just thinking now about your loop "The Navarro Loop" consisting of: perception-knowledge-Beliefs-feelings. Apart from the fact that your perspective on the first story is different from all others with good reasoning; still you offer an interesting loop. So much to think about my friend-do feelings precede beliefs, or is it the other way?? I need to ponder on your solid comment

David Navarro LΓ³pez

David Navarro LΓ³pez

4 years ago #23

@Ali Anani. It is interesting how you are revealing the chain of events in human interactions; at least, the ones are easy to see at first sight. So if we want to get positive reactions in our human interactions, it could be useful to go deeper into the rabbit hole of human feelings. It seems to me that perception-knowledge-Beliefs-feelings, are processes that use to happen in our inner self, previous to the expression of our thoughts/feelings or actions. After that, we get the feedback to our β€œexpressions”, and we can, or not, perceive it and act consequently. And this cycle seems to have no end. So in order to improve our relationships with others into a positive ones, it could be useful to work first in our perceptions, filtering the negative ones, and thus increasing our knowledge on positive ways to feed our beliefs which together with our feelings, will feedback the cycle with better components. In the case of your Greek friend, it is obvious that he was anything but humble. It was his own fault not to pass the exam, not to speak correctly English, but he reacted with violence. His perception/knowledge/beliefs of himself where as if he was much superior to his mates, and furthermore, that the rest of the humans were guilty of his own failures. The result: his mates folded back, so if he didn’t learn of this reaction, it could give him the idea that he was right on his actions. How important is it to be alert on other’s reactions, and firstly, think in which way we provoked it!!

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#38
wonderfully expressed view and to the point Max Carter. Einstein said simple enough, but not very simple. Your comment is exempalry of this quote

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#36
At least we are rich in hearts Max Carter

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#34
Because people trend to forget the obvious Max Carter

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#32
I have my stories with anger. I shared some, but you make me consider sharing more Max Carter The motive is your writing "Angry people are usually singular of focus and are now in simple expression form. Creative is not what they want in their face. They want it fixed and they want ti fixed yesterday". Very considerate you are for the feelings of others

Sara Jacobovici

Sara Jacobovici

4 years ago #18

#27
Thank you Ali Anani's wonderful comment to my attention. I agree whole heartedly with your triad Anees. I see this as one of the combinations that comes out of what I refer to as the innate triad of human nature. The main element of what influences the outcome of the triads, as you say, is awareness. With awareness the outcome can be "a healthy and happier relationship."

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Thank you dear Bill Stankiewicz. I am not less eager than you to see where discussions shall lead us to. ALready some very interesting insights

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Thank you my brother Anees Zaidi to comment on your modified or alternative triad. Then shall talk again

Sara Jacobovici

Sara Jacobovici

4 years ago #15

#24
Most grateful by your generous reply Ali Anani. Looking forward to your future writings.

Bill Stankiewicz, 🐝 Brand Ambassador

Great post Ali Ali Anani, I really enjoy reading here what you have to say & how it drives additional thoughts, and continuing discussions among bees.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#23
As always, your insightful comments move my mind and emotions dear Sara Jacobovici. I loved this " comes into the role of observer with his or her meanings attached to what is being observed". Absolutely and the way you expressed it is intriguing. As for your writing "I would not say fractally as the design can be different looking at times"- I am thinking about it and may be you spurred an idea. I shall soon write on my thoughts on this. It is a deep observation that merits deep thinking. As for the triad part, Yes, I agree. The way you outlined the triad is amazingly beautiful.

Sara Jacobovici

Sara Jacobovici

4 years ago #12

Another intriguing and captivating Buzz Ali Anani, not only producing honey but producing interesting comments and discussion. Looks like who ever the observer of effects of behaviours is comes into the role of observer with his or her meanings attached to what is being observed. This sparks emotion and that becomes what in turn effects everything else. Maybe, because of you Dr. Ali, I have triads on the brain. I see you describing human natures innate triad; the relationship of the individual with 1. self, 2. other, and 3. environment. This then is reproduced in combinations with other selves, others and environments. I would not say fractally as the design can be different looking at times.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#21
Thank you and we have an agreement point. Your story is very relevant. Why people try to anger others intentionally amazes me. Apparenly humans have widely varying "anger storage capacity".

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#15
You know the Brix Number, which measures the sweetness of fruits. Your comment has the highest Brix Number my dear sister Irene Hackett

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#17
Dear debasish majumder- we get angry at oneself. We have all experienced this. Mils and short-time anger might provoke us; else it can be destructive. I wonder how you acted or reacted? Lovely comment

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Your super comment brings the discussion alive dear Deb Helfrich. Your comment is genuine and I agree. We need that little pause between listening and acting.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#13
Gerald Hecht- yes, and the evidence surrounds us...on a geopolitical level. This is a great idea and is worthy of pursuing

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Dear friend DILMA BALBI- your English reflects your clear inner self. I understand you very well. Loved this segment of your comment "look with a little distance". The second story is consistent with your idea. The new MD had a pause time to think. Had he acted like others he would have ended like them. Because he had time to look from a distance and think he came with a creative solution. Yes, he didn't look at the chlallenge as bad and that why he succeeded. Patience is a word I love because you need to be patient in spite of bad suffering. Thank you for a highly illuminating comment

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#9
Yes, this is true and I am very happy you highlighted this point dear Gerald Hecht

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#7
Like we have sweet stress beyond which it turns sour, so is anger. A little of it is sweet and can help. but overflow (and hence my reason for using the word boundaries) can be chaotic. So, basically I am in agreement with your comment and I have no reason to disagree. My friend was angry because he thought we were mocking at his failure. In reality, we laughing at the way he pronounced ridiculous. To fail and think people are mocking at your failure is difficult to digest. I wonder what you think dear Jean?

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#5
You are spot on dear Mohammed Sultan. If people are tight with negativity and fear they shall not be creative. The second story and the linked reference support your comment and its logic. I fully concur with you

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

You are correct dear debasish majumder. Human behaviors are complex and they may easily run chaotic. In the two stories i mention in the buzz this becomes clear. A small innocent smile could lead lead to hurting. The interpretation may swing to the positive or negative side. We were not laughing because the guy failed, but his interpretation within the story context made him feel we were laughing at him. Thank you for providing me with the opportunity to explain more.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

My beloved sister Irene Hackett- truly I feel I am talking to my sister. You captured the essence of the post by saying "both illustrate the importance of developing the ability to 'sense' another's emotional state in order to avoid what could become a dangerous situation". Yes, when we ignore the current emotional state of a person we may run ourselves into trouble. I hope there shall be more comments so that you may comment again.

More articles from Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

View blog