Our Distance from True Living

Our Distance from True Living

Humans and trees share common enemies. We may learn from trees how to deal with our enemies by elucidating appropriate strategies. Trees may live for hundreds of years because they know their friends and how to welcome them and their enemies and how to deal with them. Amazingly, trees can be very selective by producing one chemical that is friendly to one insect, but not another. Trees are the huge manufacturers of chemicals. They do their chemical synthesis under mild conditions and we may learn from them how to produce the complex molecules using simple procedures.

To give one example, trees produce the glucose sugar from photosynthesis. Trees don't have a fuel tank to fill and they rely on storing glucose as an energy source when needed. Trees may transform this sugar to starch and oil. Trees could also use this sugar to produce a host of defensive chemicals. If only trees could talk for how they mastered to produce specific and highly complex molecules such as those chemicals that block the enzymes in the fungi that inflict wood decay. What brains do trees have to allow them to device such smart molecules and defense mechanisms? Even more surprising is that the blocking chemicals must have the right notches to lock in the enzyme. How did trees figure this out?

Trees reveal their secrets sometimes for us to observe and learn from. Trees do what they do for a reason. For example, they produce resins. We may think this is a simple molecule. This assumption is far from truth.

Our Distance from True Living

Some bees use the resin to construct their nests. Honey bees use this resin to seal gaps in their hives. Trees produce resin in accordance with their local needs and the resins may therefore differ in their chemical compositions. Humans use the resins for many applications as varnishes, adhesives, therapeutics and many more. Chemicals are atoms arranged in an almost infinite number of ways. Each arrangement may produce a chemical with different properties. How did trees find out which chemical composition and arrangement would do the job it does is unimaginable.

Trees have been a great source of huge number of chemicals. Anti-malaria drugs, analgesics, rubber, oils of all kinds, perfumes and many more are examples of chemicals that we benefit from trees. The tree of chemicals that we get from trees is so well illustrated in this link. Just visit to wonder.

The conflict between trees and their sometimes hostile environment, pathogens, bacteria and fungi represents the conflict we depict in writing our stories. You wish to find how to resolve this conflict in a novel way then trees will be a great inspiration for you. They have met similar challenges and solved them. If only we learn from trees. Trees are a great source for ideas of stories.


Trees represent life and distancing ourselves from them is distancing us from real living. @Irene Hackett commented on my previous buzz by writing "You and I both wish for more "knowing", which I might interpret as more awareness - awareness of our true nature". I believe a journey to a forest will awaken us to this reality.


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Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#37
This is your next buzz dear brother Anees Zaidi- simply a great idea this is

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#34
I, too, thank you Melissa Hefferman for your lovely reflections. It is early morning here and I say have a great day.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#33
The way trees talk to each other, build preferential symbiotic relationships, heal their wounds and track sunlight make be believe too they know what they do Melissa Hefferman

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

What a great quote Chas Wyatt/ The unknown has increased by not knowing who said this subtle quote. I wish the trees had tongues to talk

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#29
"I grew up talking to them"- did the trees understand you Melissa Hefferman? Do you think the trees know what they know? Yes, so much to learn

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#25
That is why I invited Harvey Lloyd

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#24
Interesting comment Harvey Lloyd and you are very correct. In my next buzz on patterns I shall be giving examples of evolutions that impose on us questions that still have no answer to. Living systems in general throw so many questions that we have no conclusive answer. May be asking has no boundaries whereas answers may have.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#21
Another relevant example may be complex data mining to generate simple rules or patterns Sara Jacobovici. You are spot on.

Sara Jacobovici

Sara Jacobovici

4 years ago #17

#24
"But now we track mill production with an App." Perfect Harvey Lloyd. Love not only hearing you communicate my perspective in your own unique way but you produced a great visual as well.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

4 years ago #16

#21
If I read the comment correctly your point is we are constantly trying to beat the natural order. Yet each evolution of the battle challenges us with new questions. So every time we leave the farm we wind up right back where started. But now we track mill production with an App

Sara Jacobovici

Sara Jacobovici

4 years ago #15

#22
"...life is organic and in flux...movement is the definition of life." Beautifully written Deb Helfrich. I agree with your perspective about tests. I think the model of education was distorted with the mass production approach of the industrial revolution. I always felt that the only thing that tests measure accurately is how good an individual is at taking tests. Thanks for mentioning my blog Deb.

Sara Jacobovici

Sara Jacobovici

4 years ago #14

#13
#14 #17 I find a paradox here gentlemen, Ali Anani. While we make the simple complex, we try to simplify complexities. For example, artificial intelligence or "[building a] biologically detailed digital reconstructions and simulations of the human brain." http://bluebrain.epfl.ch/cms/lang/en/pid/56882 The "old" us struggled with (and psychologically still does) experiencing immediate gratification and so we would want to skip the important building blocks and get straight to the results. That approach never led to successful outcomes. The "new" us wants to access information as fast as possible; download, digitally analyse and reproduce. The irony is that the organic biological aspects of humans and nature is considered "primitive" when in reality it this the sophisticated process of the tree, for example, that is able to simply let nature take its course.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#15
I am glad you did dear sister Irene Hackett and you know for sure I am quoting you soon in "Nuggets of Wisdom".

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

I am collecting soon some quotes extracted from brilliant comments and compiling them in a buzz, which I aim to title "Nuggets of Wisdom". This extract from your response Harvey Lloyd "we are human, making the simple complex is simple for us" shall be one of the quotes.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

4 years ago #11

#15
I like that statement "adding to it" Irene Hackett. In meetings i sense that we tend to "add to" the itch instead of scratching. What typically starts off as an itch will become the space shuttle and a bureaucracy of horse feathers. But alas, we are human, making the simple complex is simple for us.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

4 years ago #10

Thank you for your comments Ali Anani. Friends like trees are a treasured resource. Your mind has wandered into the deeper meanings of life and the nature that surrounds. I find myself new to this forest of thinking. You are a fine guide.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#13
What a beautiful comment this is Harvey Lloyd to enjoy this comment and I am sure she shall find it relevant to her work. Simple wisdom "Like the tree, if we have an itch, scratch well. Don't add additional limbs because of the itch:, but the effects are far-reaching. Perfect execution is the name of the game. You have a beautiful mind and happily I call you my friend.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

4 years ago #8

Trees have a single purpose or goal in existence. They do it well. What trees do for us as humans is complex and not quite as simple to define. I drew a parallel to Vince Lombardi and his coaching of a few plays but executing flawlessly. He new the other teams were aware of his plays and exactly what he was going to do. Many were perplexed by having the knowledge of what was to happen and yet no way to stop it. Perfect execution is what trees do. Maybe as humans we have become to complex for our own good. Like the tree, if we have an itch, scratch well. Don't add additional limbs because of the itch. Great read as always, thought provoking Ali Anani

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

You know better on this subject dear Sara Jacobovici and you open my eyes to new wonders. Yes, trees don't hrt others when they defend themselves and provide us with strategic ideas how to do that- only if we learn.

Sara Jacobovici

Sara Jacobovici

4 years ago #6

Wonderfully challenging and thought provoking Ali Anani. If we look at what we're trying to do in medicine, tress have been doing from the beginning of time; "be very selective by producing one (treatment) that is friendly to one (virus, bacteria, cancer cell, tumor...) but not (harm) another (healthy cell, good bacteria..)." We're good at developing things that wipe out the bad stuff but unfortunately take all the good stuff with it. Seems the art of selectivity of trees has out done the science of man.

Sara Jacobovici

Sara Jacobovici

4 years ago #5

#1
I appreciate your questions and insights Deb Lange.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#8
I appreciate greatly your support and understanding dear Irene Hackett. I looked at the number of views, comments and sharings on my previous buzzes and I don't see them declining. This shall factor in what decision I make. Thank you wholeheartedly

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#5
My dear sister Irene Hackett- it is trying to be clear that prompts me to drop off some "leaves". Your comment says I am wrong for your comment reflects what is brewing in my mind. The beauty is knowing what we don't know and still willing to go on desirably to find out answers. I don't know if I shall go on writing on the tree metaphor for the deeper I go, the more unanswered questions I find. Will the reader bear with me asking questions that have no answers? In all cases finding comments of your quality relaxes me a little. At least there are readers who expect no answers. Whatever I decide, this journey of asking and discovering more questions has been a wonderful one. You and all readers who commented, shared, liked or whatever made me feel great. I thank you all.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

debasish majumder- thank you my friend and your analogy is superb. My response is similar to the one I responded to Deb below. Thank you for intensifying my interest in this topic.

Ali ๐Ÿ Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#1
Deb Lange- The other day I pondering on questions about trees that still have no answer. For example, how very tall trees carry water from soil to their tops. It turned out that his question was only answered recently by researchers at Leicester University. It is siphoning effect with a unique mechanism that I wonder how on earth trees managed that. The list of questions is long and the complexity of trees makes them even more difficult to answer. Just if we think of the effort we do to carry water from ground to a multi-storey building and compare this with the effort exercised by trees we shall discover how much we still need to know. So, I love your questions as much as I would love being able to answer them.

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